Vmware – Horizon 8.0 (22.09) – Overview and Deployment Planning

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Horizon Overview and
Deployment Planning
VMware Horizon 2209You can find the most up-to-date technical documentation on the VMware website at:
https://docs.vmware.com/
VMware, Inc.
3401 Hillview Ave.
Palo Alto, CA 94304
www.vmware.com
Copyright
©
2022 VMware, Inc. All rights reserved. Copyright and trademark information.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 2Contents
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning 6
1 Introduction to VMware Horizon 7
Advantages of Using VMware Horizon 7
How the Components Fit Together 11
Client Devices 13
Horizon Connection Server (Horizon 8 Only) 14
Horizon Client 15
VMware Horizon User Web Portal 15
Horizon Agent 15
Horizon Console 16
vCenter Server 16
Integrating VMware Horizon 8 16
2 Horizon Cloud Service – Introduction and Getting Started 19
3 Planning a Rich User Experience 23
Feature Support Matrix for Horizon Agent 23
Choosing a Display Protocol 24
VMware Blast Extreme 24
PCoIP 29
Using Published Applications 31
Using USB Devices with Remote Desktops and Applications 31
Using Webcams and Microphones 32
Using 3D Graphics Applications 33
Streaming Multimedia to a Remote Desktop 34
Printing from a Remote Desktop 34
Using Single Sign-On for Logging In 35
Monitors and Screen Resolution 35
4 Managing Desktop and Application Pools from a Central Location 38
Desktop Pools 38
Application Pools 39
Application Provisioning 40
Deploying Published Applications Using an RDS Host 40
Deploying Published Applications That Run On Desktop Pools With VM Hosted Applications
41
Deploying Applications Within Virtual Desktops 41
VMware, Inc. 3Using Active Directory GPOs to Manage Users and Desktops 42
5 Architecture Design Elements and Planning Guidelines for Remote Desktop
Deployments 43
Guest Operating System Requirements for Remote Desktops 44
Planning Based on Types of Workers 44
Desktop Types 45
Estimating Memory Requirements for Virtual Machine Desktops 47
Estimating CPU Requirements for Virtual Machine Desktops 49
Choosing the Appropriate System Disk Size 50
Desktop Virtual Machine Configuration 51
RDS Host Virtual Machine Configuration 52
ESXi Node 53
vCenter Server Virtual Machine Configuration 54
Horizon Connection Server Maximums and Configuration for VMware Horizon 8 54
vSphere Clusters 56
Storage and Bandwidth Design Considerations 57
Shared Storage Considerations 58
Storage Bandwidth Considerations 58
Network Bandwidth Considerations 59
VMware Horizon Building Blocks 60
Horizon 8 Pods 60
Advantages of Using Multiple vCenter Servers in a Pod 62
Cloud Pod Architecture Overview 65
6 Planning for Security Features 66
Understanding Client Connections 66
Client Connections Using the PCoIP and Blast Secure Gateways 67
Tunneled Client Connections with Microsoft Remote Desktop Protocol 68
Direct Client Connections 68
Choosing a User Authentication Method for a Horizon Environment 69
Active Directory Authentication 70
Using Two-Factor Authentication 70
Smart Card Authentication 71
Using the Log In as Current User Feature Available with Windows-Based Horizon Client 71
Restricting Remote Desktop Access in Horizon Environments 73
Using Group Policy Settings to Secure Remote Desktops and Applications 74
Using Smart Policies 75
Implementing Best Practices to Secure Client Systems 75
Assigning Administrator Roles 75
Understanding Communications Protocols 76
Horizon Security Gateway 77
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 4Blast Secure Gateway 77
PCoIP Secure Gateway 78
Horizon LDAP 79
Horizon Messaging 79
Firewall Rules for Horizon Connection Server in VMware Horizon 8 Environments 79
Firewall Rules for Horizon Agent 80
Firewall Rules for Active Directory 82
7 Get Started with VMware Horizon 8 83
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 5Horizon Overview and Deployment
Planning
Planning Your Horizon Deployment provides an introduction to VMware Horizon

, including a
description of its major features and deployment options and an overview of how the components
are typically set up in a production environment.
This guide answers the following question:
n Does the product solve the problems you need it to solve?
Not all features and capabilities of VMware Horizon are available in all license editions. For a
comparison of feature sets in each edition, see https://www.vmware.com/products/horizon.html.
To help you protect your installation, this guide also provides a discussion of security features.
A high-level procedure for installing VMware Horizon and configuring an initial deployment is also
provided.
Intended Audience
This information is for IT decision makers, architects, administrators, and others who need to
familiarize themselves with the components and capabilities of this product. With this information,
architects and planners can determine whether VMware Horizon satisfies the requirements of their
enterprise for efficiently and securely delivering virtual desktops and applications to their end
users.
VMware, Inc. 6Introduction to VMware Horizon
1
With VMware Horizon and Horizon Cloud Service, IT departments can run remote desktops
and applications in the data center and deliver these desktops and applications to employees.
End users gain a familiar, personalized environment that they can access from any number
of devices anywhere throughout the enterprise or from home. Administrators gain centralized
control, efficiency, and security by having desktop data in the data center.
This chapter includes the following topics:
n Advantages of Using VMware Horizon
n How the Components Fit Together
n Integrating VMware Horizon 8
Advantages of Using VMware Horizon
The benefits of VMware Horizon include simplicity, security, speed, and scale for delivering virtual
desktops and applications with cloud-like economics and elasticity.
Flexible VMware Horizon Deployments
VMware Horizon offers the flexibility of deploying virtual desktops and applications on premises,
in a cloud-hosted environment, or a hybrid mix of both. Different deployment environments might
require different licenses.
You can deploy VMware Horizon in the following environments.
On-Premises Deployment
VMware Horizon can be deployed on infrastructures on-premises or in a private cloud. You
can use a perpetual license for an on-premises deployment. You can optionally purchase the
VMware Horizon subscription license which gives you access to the Horizon Control Plane and
associated services.
Cloud-Hosted Deployment
VMware Horizon can be deployed in a public cloud, such as VMware Cloud on AWS, or Azure
VMware Solutions. You are required to use a subscription license for deployment in a public
VMware, Inc. 7cloud. With the subscription license, you have the options to access the Horizon Control Plane
and associated services.
Hybrid Deployment
You can have VMware Horizon deployments on-premises and in cloud-hosted environments.
You can link these deployments in a federation. In this hybrid deployment scenario, you can
have the following deployments:
n Use perpetual license for your on-premises deployments and use subscription license for
your cloud-hosted deployments.
n Use subscription license for both your on-premises deployments and your cloud-hosted
deployments.
Connecting Your VMware Horizon Deployments to Horizon Control
Plane
To use the subscription license and access Horizon Control Plane, you must use the Horizon
Cloud Connector virtual appliance to connect your VMware Horizon deployment with the Horizon
Control Plane.
Horizon Control Plane (enabled by the subscription license) provides the following benefits when
connected to your VMware Horizon deployments:
n The Horizon Console provides a single unified console across on-premises and multi-cloud
deployments for working with your tenant`s fleet of cloud-connected pods.
n Hybrid multi-cloud orchestration provides a single workflow to enable VMware JMP
technologies.
n The Horizon Universal Broker is the cloud-based brokering technology used to manage and
allocate virtual resources from hybrid multi-cloud assignments to your end users.
n The Cloud Monitoring Service (CMS) is one of the central services provided in Horizon Control
Plane. The CMS gives you the ability to monitor capacity, usage, and health within and across
your fleet of cloud-connected pods, regardless of the deployment environments in which
those individual pods reside.
n The Horizon Image Management Service is a cloud-based service that simplifies and
automates the management of system images used by desktop assignments, such as desktop
pools and farms, across your cloud-connected VMware Horizon pods.
n This document provides an overview and requirements of deploying VMware Horizon. For
information about Horizon Control Plane, see the Horizon Cloud Service documentation.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 8Just-in-Time Management Platform (JMP)
JMP represents VMware Horizon capabilities for delivering just-in-time virtual desktops and
applications that are flexible, fast, and personalized. JMP includes the following VMware
technologies.
Instant Clones
Instant clone is a vSphere-based cloning technology that is used to provision thousands of
non-persistent virtual desktops from a single golden image. Instant-clone desktops offer the
following advantages:
n Rapid provisioning speed that takes 1-2 seconds on average to create a new desktop.
n Delivers a pristine, high performance desktop every time a user logs in.
n Improves security by destroying the desktop every time a user logs out.
n Eliminates the need to have a dedicated desktop for every single user.
n Zero downtime for patching a pool of desktops.
n You can couple instant clones with VMware App Volumes and VMware Dynamic
Environment Manager to deliver fully personalized desktops.
VMware App Volumes
VMware App Volumes is an integrated and unified application delivery and user management
system for VMware Horizon and other virtual environments. VMware App Volumes offers the
following advantages:
n Quickly provision applications at scale.
n Dynamically attach applications to users, groups, or devices, even when users are already
logged in to their desktop.
n Provision, deliver, update, and retire applications in real time.
n Provide a user-writable volume, allowing users to install applications that follow across
desktops.
VMware Dynamic Environment Manager
VMware Dynamic Environment Manager offers personalization and dynamic policy
configuration across any virtual, physical, and cloud-based environment. VMware Dynamic
Environment Manager offers the following advantages:
n Provide end users with quick access to a Windows workspace and applications, with a
personalized and consistent experience across devices and locations.
n Simplify end user profile management by providing organizations with a single and
scalable solution that leverages the existing infrastructure.
n Speed up the login process by applying configuration and environment settings in an
asynchronous process instead of all at login.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 9n Provide a dynamic environment configuration, such as drive or printer mappings, when a
user launches an application.
In addition to utilizing the three underlying JMP technologies, you can also orchestrate their use in
a single workflow from the Assignment wizard in the Horizon Control Plane.
Reliability and Security
Desktops and applications can be centralized by integrating with VMware vSphere® and
virtualizing server, storage, and networking resources. Placing desktop operating systems and
applications on a server in the data center provides the following advantages:
n Access to data can easily be restricted. Sensitive data can be prevented from being copied
onto a remote employee`s home computer.
n RADIUS support provides flexibility when choosing among two-factor authentication vendors.
Supported vendors include RSA SecureID, VASCO DIGIPASS, SMS Passcode, and SafeNet,
among others.
n Integration with VMware Workspace ONE Access means that end users have on-demand
access to remote desktops through the same web-based application catalog they use to
access SaaS, Web, and Windows applications. Inside a remote desktop, users can also
use this custom app store to access application. With the True SSO feature, users who
authenticate using smart cards or two-factor authentication can access their remote desktops
and applications without supplying Active Directory credentials.
n Unified Access Gateway functions as a secure gateway for users who want to access remote
desktops and applications from outside the corporate firewall. Unified Access Gateway is
an appliance that is installed in a demilitarized zone (DMZ). Use Unified Access Gateway to
ensure that the only traffic entering the corporate data center is traffic on behalf of a strongly
authenticated remote user.
n The ability to provision remote desktops with pre-created Active Directory accounts addresses
the requirements of locked-down Active Directory environments that have read-only access
policies.
n Data backups can be scheduled without considering when end users` systems might be turned
off.
n Remote desktops and applications that are hosted in a data center experience little or no
downtime. Virtual machines can reside on high-availability clusters of VMware servers.
n Virtual desktops can also connect to back-end physical systems and Microsoft Remote
Desktop Services (RDS) hosts.
Tight Integration with the VMware Ecosystem
You can use VMware Horizon with VMware vSphere, vSAN, NSX to extend the power of
virtualization with virtual compute, virtual storage, and virtual networking and security to drive
down costs, enhance the user experience, and deliver greater business agility. You can take your
deployment onto a public cloud such as VMware Cloud on AWS or VMware Azure Solutions.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 10You can also leverage additional management software such as vRealize, Avi Networks, and
Carbon Black.
Rich User Experience
VMware Horizon provides the familiar, personalized desktop environment that end users expect,
including the following user experiences:
n A rich selection of display protocols.
n Ability to access USB and other devices connected to their local computer.
n Send documents to any printer their local computer can detect.
n Real-time audio/video features.
n Authentication with smart cards.
n Use of multiple display monitors.
n 3D graphics support.
RESTful APIs
VMware Horizon RESTful APIs automate the deployment, operation, management, monitoring,
reporting, and analytics for the VMware Horizon infrastructure, workloads, and integration with
third-party products. You can use these APIs to perform the following functions:
n Desktop pool management
n Virtual machine and farm management
n Publishing applications
n Entitling published applications
n Infrastructure discovery
n Monitoring and troubleshooting
For more information about VMware Horizon REStful APIs, see the RESTful APIs available at
https://code.vmware.com/apis/1122/view-rest-api. For a list of VMware Horizon RESTful API for
each release, see KB 84155.
How the Components Fit Together
End users start Horizon Client to log in to a connection broker.
n In a VMware Horizon 8 deployment, the connection broker is the Horizon Connection Server,
which integrates with Windows Active Directory and provides access to remote desktops
hosted on a VMware vSphere server, a physical PC, or a multi-session host such as Microsoft
RDS. Horizon Connection Server also provides access to published applications on a multi-
session host.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 11n In a Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure deployment, the connection broker is one of the
following:
n If the customer is using Universal Broker, the connection broker is Universal Broker.
n If the customer is using a single pod broker, the connection broker is the active pod
manager VM, which provides access to remote desktops and applications.
The high-level example of a VMware Horizon 8 environment shows the relationships between the
major components of a VMware Horizon 8 deployment.
Figure 1-1. High-Level Example of a VMware Horizon 8 Environment
End users
Horizon Clients Horizon Control
Plane
Microsoft
Active Directory
Workspace ONE
Access
Horizon Cloud
Connector
Unified Access
Gateway
(UAG with load
balancer)
Horizon Console
(web browser)
Horizon
Connection Server
vCenter
Server
Non-vCenter
Server VMs
Physical PCs
vCenter Server
VMs (on ESXi Hosts)
Virtual Desktops
and Applications
Published Desktops
and Applications (Server OS)
Horizon Agent
RDS Hosts
-Physical RDS Hosts
– Virtualized RDS Hosts
(vCenter or non-vCenter)
Horizon Agent
Integration
VMware Dynamic
Environment Manager
(user profiling, IT settings,
and configuration
for enviroment
Virtual Desktops
and Applications
VMware App Volumes
(application deployment)
VMware vSphere
(Infrastructure platform)
VMware vSAN
(Storage platform)
VMware NSX (Networking
and security platform)
The high-level example of a Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure deployment shows the relationships
between the major components.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 12Figure 1-2. High-Level Example of a Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure Deployment
VM VM VM VM VM VM VM VM
Management Network
Admin
Horizon Cloud
Control Plane Internet
External
User
Internal
User
Gateway
VPN or
ExpressRoute
Microsoft Azure
Load Balancer
Postgres
DB
Base VM Published
Image
RG: vmw-hcs- -pool-1001
RG: vmw-hcs- -pool-100n
RG: vmw-hcs- -base-vms
RG:
vmw-hcs-
jumpbox
VM:
Jump box
(temporary)
NIC/
IP
RG: vmw-
hcs- VM: Pod
Manager 1
VM: Pod
Manager 2
DMZ
Network
Public IP
VM: Unified
Access
Gateway 1
VM: Unified
Access
Gateway 2
VM: Unified
Access
Gateway 1
VM: Unified
Access
Gateway 2
Microsoft Azure
Load Balancer
RG: vmw-hcs- -uag
RG: vmw-hcs- -uag-internal
Tenant
Network
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
NIC/
IP
Microsoft Azure
Internal Load Balancer
2 VPN Gateway
with IPsec tunnel
Connected to external network
VPN Gateway
(optional)
VPN Gateway
(optional)
For more high-level examples of a Horizon Cloud deployment, see When Adding a Horizon Cloud
Pod on Microsoft Azure as Your Very First Pod in Your Horizon Cloud Pod Fleet.
Client Devices
A major advantage of using VMware Horizon is that remote desktops and applications follow the
end user regardless of device or location. Users can access their personalized virtual desktop or
remote application from a company laptop, their home PC, a thin client device, a Mac, or a tablet
or phone.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 13End users open Horizon Client to display their remote desktops and applications. Thin client
devices use VMware Horizon thin client software and can be configured so that the only
application that users can launch directly on the device is VMware Horizon Thin Client.
Repurposing a legacy PC into a thin client desktop can extend the life of the hardware by three
to five years. For example, by using VMware Horizon on a thin desktop, you can use a newer
operating system such as Windows 10 on older desktop hardware.
If you use the HTML Access feature, end users can open a remote desktop inside a browser,
without having to install any client application on the client system or device.
Horizon Connection Server (Horizon 8 Only)
This software service acts as a broker for client connections in Horizon 8 environments. Horizon
Connection Server authenticates users through Windows Active Directory and directs the request
to the appropriate virtual machine, physical PC, or Microsoft RDS host.
Connection Server provides the following management capabilities:
n Authenticating users
n Entitling users to specific desktops and pools
n Managing remote desktop and application sessions
n Establishing secure connections between users and remote desktops and applications
n Enabling single sign-on
n Setting and applying policies
Inside the corporate firewall, you install and configure a group of two or more Connection Server
instances. Their configuration data is stored in an embedded LDAP directory and is replicated
among members of the group.
Outside the corporate firewall, in the DMZ, you can install a Unified Access Gateway appliance.
Unified Access Gateway appliances in the DMZ communicate with Connection Servers inside
the corporate firewall. Unified Access Gateway appliances ensure that the only remote desktop
and application traffic that can enter the corporate data center is traffic on behalf of a strongly
authenticated user. Users can access only the resources that they are authorized to access.
For more information about Unified Access Gateway appliances, see the Unified Access Gateway
documentation at https://docs.vmware.com/en/Unified-Access-Gateway/index.html.
Important It is possible to create a VMware Horizon setup that does not use Connection Server. If
you install the Horizon Agent Direct-Connection Plug-In (formerly View Agent Direct-Connection
Plug-In) in a remote virtual machine desktop, the client can connect directly to the virtual machine.
All the remote desktop features, including PCoIP, HTML Access, RDP, USB redirection, and
session management work in the same way, as if the user had connected through Connection
Server. For more information, see the Horizon Agent Direct-Connection Plugin document.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 14Horizon Client
The client software for accessing remote desktops and applications can run on a tablet, a phone, a
Windows, Linux, or Mac PC or laptop, a thin client, and more.
After logging in, users select from a list of remote desktops and applications that they are
authorized to use. Authorization can require Active Directory credentials, a UPN, a smart card
PIN, or an RSA SecurID or other two-factor authentication token.
An administrator can configure Horizon Client to allow end users to select a display protocol.
Protocols include PCoIP, Blast Extreme, and Microsoft RDP for remote desktops. The speed and
display quality of PCoIP and Blast Extreme rival that of a physical PC.
Features differ according to which Horizon Client you use. This guide focuses on Horizon Client for
Windows. The following types of clients are not described in detail in this guide:
n Details about Horizon Client for tablets, Linux clients, and Mac clients. See the Horizon Client
documentation at https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-Horizon/index.html.
n Details about the HTML Access Web client, which allows you to open a remote desktop inside
a browser. No Horizon Client application is installed on the client system or device. See the
Horizon Client documentation at https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-Horizon/index.html.
n Various third-party thin clients and zero clients, available only through certified partners.
VMware Horizon User Web Portal
From a Web browser on a client device, end users in Horizon environments can connect to remote
desktops and applications through the browser, automatically start Horizon Client if it is installed,
or download the Horizon Client installer.
When you open a browser and enter the URL of the connection broker, the Web page that
appears contains links to the VMware Downloads site for downloading Horizon Client. The links on
the Web page are configurable, however. For example, you can configure the links to point to an
internal Web server, or you can limit which client versions are available on your own connection
broker.
If you use the HTML Access feature, the Web page also displays a link for accessing remote
desktops and applications inside a supported browser. With this feature, no Horizon Client
application is installed on the client system or device. For more information, see the Horizon Client
documentation at https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-Horizon/index.html.
Horizon Agent
You install the Horizon Agent service on all virtual machines, physical systems, and Microsoft
RDS hosts that you use as sources for remote desktops and applications. On virtual machines,
this agent communicates with Horizon Client to provide features such as connection monitoring,
integrated printing, and access to locally connected USB devices.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 15If the desktop source is a virtual machine, you first install the Horizon Agent service on that virtual
machine and then use the virtual machine as a template or as a golden image of instant clones.
When you create a pool from this virtual machine, the agent is automatically installed on every
remote desktop.
You can install the agent with an option for single sign-on. With single sign-on, users are
prompted to log in only when they connect to the connection broker and are not prompted a
second time to connect to a remote desktop or application.
Horizon Console
This web-based application allows administrators to configure the connection broker, deploy and
manage remote desktops and applications, control user authentication, and troubleshoot end user
issues.
When you install a connection broker instance, you also get the URL for the console web interface.
This web interface allows administrators to manage connection broker instances from anywhere
without having to install an application on their local computer.
vCenter Server
If you are deploying Horizon 8 on vSphere, vCenter Server acts as a central administrator for
VMware ESXi servers that are connected on a network. vCenter Server provides the central point
for configuring, provisioning, and managing virtual machines in the data center.
In addition to using these virtual machines as sources for virtual machine desktop pools, you can
use virtual machines to host the server components of VMware Horizon, including connection
brokers, Active Directory servers, Microsoft RDS hosts, and vCenter Server instances.
Integrating VMware Horizon 8
To enhance the effectiveness of VMware Horizon 8 in your organization, you can use several
interfaces to integrate VMware Horizon 8 with external applications or to create administration
scripts that you can run from the command line or in batch mode.
Integrating VMware Horizon 8 with Business Intelligence Software
You can configure Horizon Connection Server to record events to a Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle,
or PostgreSQL database.
n End-user actions such as logging in and starting a desktop session.
n Administrator actions such as adding entitlements and creating desktop pools.
n Alerts that report system failures and errors.
n Statistical sampling such as recording the maximum number of users over a 24-hour period.
You can use business intelligence reporting engines such as Crystal Reports, IBM Cognos,
MicroStrategy 9, and Oracle Enterprise Performance Management System to access and analyze
the event database.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 16For more information, see Horizon Administration.
You can alternatively generate VMware Horizon 8 events in Syslog format so that the event
data can be accessible to analytics software. If you enable file-based logging of events, events
accumulate in a local log file. If you specify a file share, the log files move to that share. For more
information, see the Horizon Installation and Upgrade document.
Using Horizon PowerCLI Cmdlets to Create Administration Scripts
You can use Horizon PowerCLI cmdlets with VMware PowerCLI. Use Horizon PowerCLI cmdlets to
perform various administration tasks on Horizon components.
For more information about Horizon PowerCLI cmdlets, read the VMware PowerCLI Cmdlets
Reference available at https://code.vmware.com/docs/6978/cmdlet-reference.
For information on the API specifications to create advanced functions and scripts to use with
Horizon PowerCLI, see the Horizon API Reference at the VMware Developer Center.
For more information on sample scripts that you can use to create your own Horizon PowerCLI
scripts, see the Horizon PowerCLI community on GitHub.
You can use the Horizon PowerCLI cmdlets to perform various administration tasks on VMware
Horizon 8 components.
n Create and update desktop pools.
n Configure multiple network labels to greatly expand the number of IP addresses assigned to
virtual machines in a pool.
n Add data center resources to a full virtual machine.
n Sample the usage of specific desktops or desktop pools over time.
n Query the event database.
n Query the state of services.
Modifying LDAP Configuration Data in VMware Horizon 8
When you use Horizon Console to modify the configuration of VMware Horizon 8, the appropriate
LDAP data in the repository is updated. Horizon Connection Server stores its configuration
information in an LDAP compatible repository. For example, if you add a desktop pool,
Connection Server stores information about users, user groups, and entitlements in LDAP.
You can use VMware and Microsoft command-line tools to export and import LDAP configuration
data in LDAP Data Interchange Format (LDIF) files from and into VMware Horizon 8. These
commands are for advanced administrators who want to use scripts to update configuration data
without using Horizon Console or Horizon PowerCLI.
You can use LDIF files to perform a number of tasks.
n Transfer configuration data between Connection Server instances.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 17n Define a large number of VMware Horizon 8 objects, such as desktop pools, and add these to
your Connection Server instances without using Horizon Console or Horizon PowerCLI.
n Back up a configuration so that you can restore the state of a Connection Server instance.
For more information, see the Horizon Administration document.
Using the vdmadmin Command
You can use the vdmadmin command line interface to perform a variety of administration tasks
on a Connection Server instance. You can use vdmadmin to perform administration tasks that are
not possible from within the Horizon Console user interface or that need to run automatically from
scripts.
For more information, see the Horizon Administration document.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 18Horizon Cloud Service –
Introduction and Getting Started
2
This documentation page introduces the VMware Horizon Cloud Service and Horizon Control
Plane services and provides pointers to additional documentation about how you can get started
using the services to deploy, manage, and monitor virtual desktops and apps from a single
console.
Introduction
Note Currently, the service offerings consist of these generations. Next-gen is the modern
evolution from the initial generation`s architecture. This page briefly introduces each generation`s
getting-started path and provides pointers to additional information.
n Horizon Cloud Service – next gen
n Horizon Cloud Service – initial generation
To download the applicable service-related components, see Download VMware Horizon Service
in VMware Customer Connect.
Getting Started with Horizon Cloud Service – next gen
VMware Horizon Cloud Service – next gen provides a variety of benefits that improve the Horizon
Cloud experience.
VMware, Inc. 19Unprecedented
Scalability
Unified platform across
on-premises and cloud
Advanced
Automation
Seamless Hybrid &
Multi-Cloud
Experience
Improved Visibility
& Troubleshooting
Lower Costs
Lower costs
“Pod-less” infrastructure results in lower operational costs, faster time to value, and reduced
maintenance.
Improved visibility and troubleshooting
Using the same model across all platforms improves visibility and troubleshooting capabilities
with proactive alerting and advanced reporting.
Seamless hybrid and multi-cloud experience
Common admin and end-user experience across hybrid and multi-cloud streamlines
administration and increases end-user productivity.
Advanced automation
API-driven platform supports advanced automation and integration with third-party apps and
services or Day 2 management processes.
Unprecedented scalability
“Thin edge” architecture and a cloud-native architecture increases scalability across all
platforms.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 20Horizon Cloud next-gen is a modern cloud-first, multi-cloud Desktop as a Service (DaaS)
deployment with Thin Edge Infrastructure. The service provides you with a global view of your
desktops and applications spanning across on-premises and cloud environments. Regardless
of the location of your desktop and application deployments, Horizon Cloud enables you to
consistently manage and monitor them.
To get started, see the Horizon Cloud next-gen documentation:
n Horizon Cloud next-gen Release Notes
n Using Horizon Cloud – next-gen
Horizon Cloud next-gen is currently available as a Limited Availability release. A Limited
Availability release is enabled on a tenant-by-tenant basis, usually on a per-request basis. To have
use of this release, your tenant must be explicitly enabled for it. To request enablement, please
contact your VMware representative.
Getting Started with Horizon Cloud Service – initial
generation
The initial generation of VMware Horizon Cloud Service and Horizon Control Plane service
deploys, manages, and monitors virtual desktops and apps from a single console.
1
Obtain Horizon
Universal License
2
Horizon in a Private Data Center,
VMware SDDC, or Public Cloud
Pair Connector
with Horizon
Control Plane
Download and
Deploy Horizon
Cloud Connector
Deploy Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure
Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure
3
Register AD to
Horizon Control Plane
4
Start Using
Horizon Service
If your service tenant account is associated with the initial generation service, use these steps to
get started:
1 Get a Horizon SaaS subscription license.
Note The initial purchaser will receive the Welcome email which contains links to instructions
for how to add your IT admins to the tenant, log in to the console for the first time, and other
starting points.
2 Choose and complete your first deployment.
n Horizon pod and Horizon Cloud Connector
n Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure
3 Register your Active Directory to the Control Plane
4 Start using the Horizon Control Plane services with your deployment.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 21Supporting documentation:
n Checklist – Cloud Connector and Horizon pods
n Checklist – Horizon Cloud on Microsoft Azure
n Horizon Cloud Release Notes
n Deployment Guide
n Administration Guide
n Managing Images Guide
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 22Planning a Rich User Experience
3
VMware Horizon provides the familiar, personalized desktop environment that end users expect.
For example, on some client systems, end users can access USB and other devices connected
to their local computer, send documents to any printer that their local computer can detect,
authenticate with smart cards, and use multiple display monitors.
VMware Horizon includes many features that you might want to make available to your end users.
Before you decide which features to use, you must understand the limitations and restrictions of
each feature.
This chapter includes the following topics:
n Feature Support Matrix for Horizon Agent
n Choosing a Display Protocol
n Using Published Applications
n Using USB Devices with Remote Desktops and Applications
n Using Webcams and Microphones
n Using 3D Graphics Applications
n Streaming Multimedia to a Remote Desktop
n Printing from a Remote Desktop
n Using Single Sign-On for Logging In
n Monitors and Screen Resolution
Feature Support Matrix for Horizon Agent
When planning which display protocol and features to make available to your end users, use
the following information to determine which agent (remote desktop and application) operating
systems support the feature.
The types and editions of the supported guest operating system depend on the Windows version.
For a list of Windows 10 guest operating systems, see the VMware Knowledge Base (KB) article
https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/78714.
VMware, Inc. 23For Windows operating systems, other than Windows 10, see the VMware Knowledge Base (KB)
article https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/78715.
Note For information about which features are supported on the various types of client
devices, see the Horizon Client documentation at https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-Horizon/
index.html.
In addition, several VMware partners offer thin and zero client devices for VMware Horizon
deployments. The features that are available for each thin or zero client device are determined
by the vendor and model and the configuration that an enterprise chooses to use. For information
about the vendors and models for thin and zero client devices, see the VMware Compatibility
Guide, available on the VMware Web site.
Choosing a Display Protocol
A display protocol provides end users with a graphical interface to a remote desktop or application
that resides in the data center. Depending on which type of client device you have, you can
choose from among Blast Extreme and PCoIP (PC-over-IP), which VMware provides, or Microsoft
RDP (Remote Desktop Protocol).
You can set policies to control which protocol is used or to allow end users to choose the protocol
when they log in to a desktop.
Note For some types of clients, neither the PCoIP nor the RDP remote display protocol is used.
For example, if you use the HTML Access client, available with the HTML Access feature, the Blast
Extreme protocol is used, rather than PCoIP or RDP. Similarly, if you use a remote Linux desktop,
Blast Extreme is used.
VMware Blast Extreme
Optimized for the mobile cloud, VMware Blast Extreme supports the broadest range of client
devices that are H.264, HEVC, JPEG, PNG, and proprietary Blast codec capable. Of the display
protocols, VMware Blast Extreme offers the lowest CPU consumption for longer battery life on
mobile devices. VMware Blast Extreme can compensate for an increase in latency or a reduction in
bandwidth and can leverage both TCP and UDP network transports.
The VMware Blast Extreme display protocol can be used for published applications and for remote
desktops that use virtual machines or shared-session desktops on an RDS host. The RDS host can
be a physical machine or a virtual machine. The VMware Blast display protocol does not operate
on a single-user physical computer, except for the enterprise edition of Windows 10 RS4 and later
builds.
Note Movies & TV applications are not supported for physical computers running Windows 10
RS4.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 24VMware Blast Extreme Features
Key features of VMware Blast Extreme include the following:
n Users outside the corporate firewall can use this protocol with the corporate virtual private
network (VPN), or users can make secure, encrypted connections to the Unified Access
Gateway appliance in the corporate DMZ.
Note It is not recommended to use VPN since Blast connections are already encrypted. For a
better user experience, use the Unified Access Gateway appliance instead.
n Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) 128-bit encryption is supported and is turned on by
default. You can, however, change the encryption key cipher to AES-256.
n Connections from all types of client devices.
n Optimization controls for reducing bandwidth usage on the LAN and WAN.
n Performance counters displayed using PerfMon on Windows agents provide an accurate
representation of the current state of the system that also updates at a constant rate for the
following:
n Blast session
n Imaging
n Audio
n CDR
n USB: USB counters displayed using PerfMon on Windows agents are valid if USB traffic is
configured to use VMware Virtual Channel (VVC).
n Skype for Business: counters are for control traffic only.
n Clipboard
n RTAV
n Serial port and scanner redirection features
n Virtual printing
n HTML5 MMR
n Windows Media MMR: Performance counters appear only if you configured this feature to
use VMware Virtual Channel (VVC).
n Network continuity during momentary network loss on Windows clients.
n 32-bit color is supported for virtual displays.
n ClearType fonts are supported.
n Audio redirection with dynamic audio quality adjustment for LAN and WAN.
n Real-Time Audio-Video for using webcams and microphones on some client types.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 25n Copy and paste of text and, on some clients, images between the client operating system and
a remote desktop or published application. For other client types, only copy and paste of plain
text is supported. You cannot copy and paste system objects such as folders and files between
systems.
n Multiple monitors are supported for some client types. On some clients, you can use up to
four monitors with a resolution of up to 2560 x 1600 per display or up to three monitors with
a resolution of 4K (3840 x 2160) for Windows desktops. Pivot display and autofit are also
supported.
When the 3D feature is enabled, up to two monitors are supported with a resolution of up to
1920 x 1200, or one monitor with a resolution of 4K (3840 x 2160).
n USB redirection is supported for some client types.
n MMR redirection is supported for some Windows client operating systems and some remote
desktop operating systems (with Horizon Agent installed).
n Connections to physical machines that have no monitors attached are supported with NVIDIA
graphics cards. For best performance, use a graphics card that supports H.264 encoding.
If you have an add-in discrete GPU and an embedded GPU, the operating system might
default to the embedded GPU. To fix this problem, you can disable or remove the device in
Device Manager. If the problem persists, you can install the WDDM graphics driver for the
embedded GPU, or disable the embedded GPU in the system BIOS. Refer to your system
documentation on how disable the embedded GPU.
Caution Disabling the embedded GPU might cause future loss of access to functionality such
as console access to BIOS setup or NT Boot Loader.
n The Blast Codec improves on Adaptive and on H.264 encoders in desktop usage by delivering
sharper images and fonts and operates like a video codec with motion detection, motion
vectors, and inter-predicted macroblocks. It is supported on the following environments and is
disabled by default:
n Windows and Linux agents. To enable the codec:
n On a Windows agent, set the registry key: HKLMSOFTWAREVMware, Inc.VMware
BlastConfigEncoderBlastCodecEnabled = 1
n On a Linux agent: etcvmwareconfig, set RemoteDisplay.allowBlastCodec=TRUE
n Disable H.264 and HEVC on Windows, Linux, and MacOS client settings. This feature is not
supported on mobile clients and the Web client.
n A dynamic encoder switch allows you to switch between a video optimized encoder (H.264
4:2:0 or H.264 4:4:4) and a text optimized encoder (Blast Codec or Adaptive). This switch
helps maintain crisp text and video with reduced bandwidth usage. To use this feature, enable
the encoder switch:
n On a Windows agent, set the registry key HKLMSOFTWAREVMware, Inc.VMware
BlastConfigEncoderSwitchEnabled = 1
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 26n On a Linux agent: etcvmwareconfig, set RemoteDisplay.allowSwitchEncoder=TRUE
n Enable Blast Codec, which is disabled by default. If Blast Codec is not enabled, the switch
encoder uses Adaptive for text optimized encoding.
n Enable H.264 on Windows, Linux, and MacOS client settings. This feature is not supported
on mobile clients and the Web client.
Note The encoder switch only uses software H.264 and does not support hardware-
accelerated graphics.
n Blast Extreme implements High Dynamic Range (HDR) encoding, which expands the range of
brightness in a digital image to provide a more realistic depiction of a scene. HDR is enabled
by default on the agent. You can add these optional registry keys REG_SZ (string value) on a
Windows agent:
n PixelProviderHDRReferenceWhite: an integer greater than 0 that controls the relative
brightness of the paper white level. The default value is 80.
n TopologyHDREnabled = 1 to enable HDR. The default value is 1.
n TopologyHDREnabled = 0 to disable HDR.
On the client, set the optional registry key REG_SZ (string value) HKLMSOFTWAREVMware,
Inc.VMware VDMClientAllowClientHDR to True or False for HDR topology requests. The
default value is True.
In the client VMware Blast settings, turn on Allow High Efficiency Video Decoding (HEVC)
and Allow High Dynamic Range Decoding (HDR).
n VMware Blast detects the presence of a vGPU system and applies higher quality default
settings. There is a unified image quality configuration setting that controls the remoted
display image quality level across all Blast encoders. For more information, see “VMware Blast
Policy Settings” in the Horizon Remote Desktop Features and GPOs document.
For information about which client devices support specific VMware Blast Extreme features, go to
https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-Horizon-Client/index.html.
Wake-on-LAN
In Horizon environments, Wake-on-LAN is supported for physical machines with the Enterprise
edition of Windows 10 RS4 and later. With this feature, users can wake up physical machines when
connecting with the connection broker. The Wake-on-LAN feature has these prerequisites:
n Wake-on-LAN (WoL) is only supported on IPv4 environments.
n The physical machine must be configured to wake up on receiving Wake-on-LAN packets
when Wake-on-LAN is enabled in the BIOS settings as well as network card settings.
n Destination port 9 is used for WoL packets from the connection broker.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 27n WoL packets are IP-directed broadcast packets that must be able to reach Horizon Agent
when sent from the connection broker. Wake-on-LAN functions in these scenarios:
n Connection broker and Horizon Agent on the physical machine are on the same subnet in a
LAN environment.
n All routers between the connection broker and Horizon Agent are configured to allow the
IP-directed broadcast packet for the target subnet of the physical machine you want to
wake up.
Note The Wake-on-LAN feature does not support floating-assignment pools of a physical
Windows 10 agent. The WoL packet is only sent to dedicated assignment pools entitled with a
particular user.
Recommended Guest Operating System Settings
1 GB of RAM or more and a dual CPU is recommended for playing in high-definition, full screen
mode, or 720p or higher formatted video. To use Virtual Dedicated Graphics Acceleration for
graphics-intensive applications such as CAD applications, 4 GB of RAM is required.
Video Quality Requirements
480p-formatted video
You can play video at 480p or lower at native resolutions when the remote desktop has
a single virtual CPU. If you want to play the video in high-definition Flash or in full screen
mode, the desktop requires a dual virtual CPU. Even with a dual virtual CPU desktop, as low
as 360p-formatted video played in full screen mode can lag behind audio, particularly on
Windows clients.
720p-formatted video
You can play video at 720p at native resolutions if the remote desktop has a dual virtual CPU.
Performance might be affected if you play videos at 720p in high definition or in full screen
mode.
1080p-formatted video
If the remote desktop has a dual virtual CPU, you can play 1080p formatted video, although
the media player might need to be adjusted to a smaller window size.
3D rendering
You can configure remote desktops to use software- or hardware-accelerated graphics.
The software-accelerated graphics feature enables you to run DirectX 9 and OpenGL 2.1
applications without requiring a physical graphics processing unit (GPU). The hardware-
accelerated graphics features enable virtual machines to either share the physical GPUs
(graphical processing unit) on a vSphere host or dedicate a physical GPU to a single virtual
desktop.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 28For 3D applications, up to two monitors are supported, and the maximum screen resolution is
1920 x 1200.
For more information about 3D features, see Using 3D Graphics Applications.
Hardware Requirements for Client Systems
For information about processor and memory requirements for the specific type of desktop or
mobile client device, go to https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-Horizon/index.html.
PCoIP
PCoIP (PC over IP) provides an optimized desktop experience for the delivery of a published
application or an entire remote desktop environment, including applications, images, audio, and
video content for a wide range of users on the LAN or across the WAN. PCoIP can compensate for
an increase in latency or a reduction in bandwidth, to ensure that end users can remain productive
regardless of network conditions.
The PCoIP display protocol can be used for published applications and for remote desktops
that use virtual machines, physical machines that contain Teradici host cards, or shared session
desktops on an RDS host.
PCoIP Features
Key features of PCoIP include the following:
n Users outside the corporate firewall can use this protocol with your company`s virtual private
network (VPN), or users can make secure, encrypted connections to the Unified Access
Gateway appliance in the corporate DMZ.
n Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) 128-bit encryption is supported and is turned on by
default. You can, however, change the encryption key cipher to AES-256.
n Connections from all types of client devices.
n Optimization controls for reducing bandwidth usage on the LAN and WAN.
n 32-bit color is supported for virtual displays.
n ClearType fonts are supported.
n Audio redirection with dynamic audio quality adjustment for LAN and WAN.
n Real-Time Audio-Video for using webcams and microphones on some client types.
n Copy and paste of text and, on some clients, images between the client operating system and
a remote desktop or published application. For other client types, only copy and paste of plain
text is supported. You cannot copy and paste system objects such as folders and files between
systems.
n Multiple monitors are supported for some client types. On some clients, you can use up to
4 monitors with a resolution of up to 2560 x 1600 per display or up to 3 monitors with a
resolution of 4K (3840 x 2160). Pivot display and autofit are also supported.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 29When the 3D feature is enabled, up to 2 monitors are supported with a resolution of up to
1920 x 1200, or one monitor with a resolution of 4K (3840 x 2160).
n USB redirection is supported for some client types.
n MMR redirection is supported for some Windows client operating systems and some remote
desktop operating systems (with Horizon Agent installed).
For information about which desktop operating systems support specific PCoIP features, see
Feature Support Matrix for Horizon Agent.
For information about which client devices support specific PCoIP features, go to https://
docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-Horizon-Client/index.html.
Recommended Guest Operating System Settings
1GB of RAM or more and a dual CPU is recommended for playing in high-definition, full screen
mode, or 720p or higher formatted video. To use Virtual Dedicated Graphics Acceleration for
graphics-intensive applications such as CAD applications, 4GB of RAM is required.
Video Quality Requirements
480p-formatted video
You can play video at 480p or lower at native resolutions when the remote desktop has
a single virtual CPU. If you want to play the video in high-definition Flash or in full screen
mode, the desktop requires a dual virtual CPU. Even with a dual virtual CPU desktop, as low
as 360p-formatted video played in full screen mode can lag behind audio, particularly on
Windows clients.
720p-formatted video
You can play video at 720p at native resolutions if the remote desktop has a dual virtual CPU.
Performance might be affected if you play videos at 720p in high definition or in full screen
mode.
1080p-formatted video
If the remote desktop has a dual virtual CPU, you can play 1080p formatted video, although
the media player might need to be adjusted to a smaller window size.
3D rendering
You can configure remote desktops to use software- or hardware-accelerated graphics.
The software-accelerated graphics feature enables you to run DirectX 9 and OpenGL 2.1
applications without requiring a physical graphics processing unit (GPU). The hardware-
accelerated graphics features enable virtual machines to either share the physical GPUs
(graphical processing unit) on a vSphere host or dedicate a physical GPU to a single virtual
machine desktop.
For more information about 3D features, see Using 3D Graphics Applications.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 30Hardware Requirements for Client Systems
For information about processor and memory requirements, see the “Using VMware Horizon
Client” document for the specific type of desktop or mobile client device. Go to https://
docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-Horizon-Client/index.html.
Using Published Applications
You can use Horizon Client to securely access published Windows-based applications, in addition
to remote desktops.
With this feature, after launching Horizon Client and logging in to a connection broker, users see
all the published applications they are entitled to use, in addition to remote desktops. Selecting
an application opens a window for that application on the local client device, and the application
looks and behaves as if it were locally installed.
For example, on a Windows client computer, if you minimize the application window, an item
for that application remains in the Taskbar and looks identical to the way it would look if it were
installed on the local Windows computer. You can also create a shortcut for the application that
will appear on your client desktop, just like shortcuts for locally installed applications.
Deploying published applications in this way might be preferable to deploying complete remote
desktops under the following conditions:
n If an application is set up with a multi-tiered architecture, where the components work better
if they are located geographically near each other, using published applications is a good
solution.
For example, when a user must access a database remotely, if large amounts of data must be
transmitted over the WAN, performance is usually affected. With published applications, all
parts of the application can be located in the same data center as the database, so that traffic
is isolated and only the screen updates are sent across the WAN.
n From a mobile device, accessing an individual application is easier than opening a remote
Windows desktop and then navigating to the application.
To use this feature, you install applications on a Microsoft RDS host. In this respect, VMware
Horizon published applications work similarly to other application remoting solutions. VMware
Horizon published applications are delivered using either the Blast Extreme display protocol or the
PCoIP display protocol, for an optimized user experience.
Using USB Devices with Remote Desktops and Applications
Administrators can configure the ability to use USB devices, such as thumb flash drives, cameras,
VoIP (voice-over-IP) devices, and printers, from a virtual desktop. This feature is called USB
redirection. A virtual desktop can accommodate up to 255 USB devices.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 31You can also redirect certain locally connected USB devices for use in published desktops and
applications. For information about the specific types of devices that are supported, see the
Horizon Remote Desktop Features and GPOs document.
When you use this feature in desktop pools that are deployed on single-user machines, most USB
devices that are attached to the local client system become available in the remote desktop. You
can even connect to and manage an iPad from a remote desktop. For example, you can sync
your iPad with iTunes installed in your remote desktop. On some client devices, such as Windows
and Mac computers, the USB devices are listed in a menu in Horizon Client. You use the menu to
connect and disconnect the devices.
In most cases, you cannot use a USB device in your client system and in your remote desktop at
the same time. Only a few types of USB devices can be shared between a remote desktop and the
local computer. These devices include smart card readers and human interface devices, such as
keyboards and pointing devices.
Administrators can specify the types of USB devices to which end users are allowed to connect.
For composite devices that contain multiple types of devices, such as a video input device and a
storage device, on some client systems, administrators can split the device so that one device (for
example, the video input device) is allowed but the other device (for example, the storage device)
is not.
The USB redirection feature is available only on certain types of clients. To find out whether this
feature is supported on a particular client, see the feature support matrix included in the Horizon
Client installation and setup document for that client.
Using Webcams and Microphones
With the Real-Time Audio-Video feature, you can use the local client system`s webcam or
microphone in a remote desktop or published application. Real-Time Audio-Video is compatible
with standard conferencing applications and browser-based video applications. It supports
standard webcams, audio USB devices, and analog audio input.
For information about setting up the Real-Time Audio-Video feature on the agent machine,
including configuring the frame rate and image resolution, see the Horizon Remote Desktop
Features and GPOs document.
End users can run Skype, Webex, Google Hangouts, and other online conferencing applications
in their remote desktops. This feature redirects video and audio data to the agent machine with
a lower bandwidth than can be achieved by using USB redirection. With Real-Time Audio-Video,
webcam images and audio input are encoded on the client system and then sent to the agent
machine. On the agent machine, a virtual webcam and virtual microphone can decode and play
the stream, which the third-party application can use.
Horizon Overview and Deployment Planning
VMware, Inc. 32No special configuration is necessary, although administrators can set agent-side group policies
and registry keys to configure frame rate and image resolution, or to turn off the feature. By
default, the resolution is 320 by 240 pixels at 15 frames per second. If needed, administrators can
also use client-side configuration settings to set a preferred webcam or audio device.
Note This feature is available only on some types of clients. To find out whether this feature is
supported on a particular type of client, see the feature support matrix included in the installation
and setup document for the specific type of desktop or mobile client device.
Using 3D Graphics Applications
The software- and hardware-accelerated graphics features available with the Blast Extreme or
PCoIP display protocol enable remote desktop users to run 3D applications ranging from Google
Earth to CAD and other graphics-intensive applications.
NVIDIA GRID vGPU (shared GPU hardware acceleration)
Available with vSphere, this feature allows a physical GPU (graphical processing unit) on an
ESXi host to be shared among virtual machines. Use this feature if you require high-end,
hardware-accelerat

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