Steinberg2 – Dorico Pro 3.5 – First Steps

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First StepsThe Steinberg Documentation Team: Cristina Bachmann, Heiko Bischoff, Lillie Harris, Christina Kaboth, Insa
Mingers, Matthias Obrecht, Sabine Pfeifer, Benjamin Schütte, Marita Sladek
Translation: Ability InterBusiness Solutions (AIBS), Moon Chen, Jérémie Dal Santo, Rosa Freitag, Josep Llodra
Grimalt, Vadim Kupriianov, Filippo Manfredi, Roland Münchow, Boris Rogowski, Sergey Tamarovsky
This document provides improved access for people who are blind or have low vision. Please note that due to the
complexity and number of images in this document, it is not possible to include text descriptions of images.
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and does not represent a commitment on
the part of Steinberg Media Technologies GmbH. The software described by this document is subject to a License
Agreement and may not be copied to other media except as specifically allowed in the License Agreement.
No part of this publication may be copied, reproduced, or otherwise transmitted or recorded, for any purpose,
without prior written permission by Steinberg Media Technologies GmbH. Registered licensees of the product
described herein may print one copy of this document for their personal use.
All product and company names are ™ or ® trademarks of their respective owners. For more information, please
visit www.steinberg.net/trademarks.
© Steinberg Media Technologies GmbH, 2021.
All rights reserved.
Dorico_3.5.12_en-US_2021-06-15Table of Contents
4 Introduction
4 Tour of the user interface
6 Functions of the modes
7 Dorico projects
8 Key commands
9 Setting up the project
9 Starting a new project
10 Adding a solo piano player
11 Deleting the spare layout
12 Writing music
12 Popovers
13 Adding a key signature
14 Adding a time signature
15 Adding bars
16 Caret
16 Inputting the melody on the top staff
18 Inputting the chords on the bottom staff
21 Adding accidentals
22 Adding another voice to the top staff
25 Adding slurs
27 Inputting a tie
28 Adding dynamics
30 Adding articulations
33 Adding arpeggio signs to chords
34 Adding tempo marks
36 Adding clef changes
37 Deleting rests
38 Inputting tuplets
41 Adding a grace note
42 Adding an octave line
43 Inputting the music in bars 33-35
45 Crossing notes to the other staff
47 Respelling notes
48 Adding indications for left/right hands
50 Adding the repeat ending
51 Finish writing the music
53 Laying out and formatting pages
54 Adding the title and composer
55 Master pages and tokens
56 Hiding the flo w heading
57 Hiding staff labels
58 Changing the page size and margins
59 Deleting the copyright text frame (Dorico Pro
only)
61 Changing the staff size
62 Changing vertical spacing settings
63 Changing note and cross-staff beam spacing
64 Starting on a left-hand page
65 Changing stem directions
66 Changing beam grouping
67 Aligning dynamics
68 Adjusting the shapes of slurs (Dorico Pro only)
70 Moving items graphically (Dorico Pro only)
73 Playing back music
73 Changing the audio output device
74 Applying a playback template
75 Playing back the piece
76 Changing dynamic levels in playback
79 Changing the poco rit. final tempo
79 Changing the played duration of notes
83 Printing and exporting
83 Printing hard copies
84 Exporting to PDF
86 Exporting the audio
88 Further notations
88 Adding lyrics
90 Adding fermatas
91 Adding a mute playing technique
92 Adding chord symbols
94 Adding rhythm slashes
97 Adding bar repeats
98 Showing chord symbols above different staves
99 Adding a drum set
101 Inputting notes on a drum set
104 Adding tremolos
104 Enabling swing playback for the drum set
106 Removing the drum set from the full score
107 Final tips
108 Index
3
Dorico 3.5.12Introduction
Welcome to this First Steps guide, which we have created to help you get started with Dorico by
taking you through all the steps necessary to create and prepare a short piano piece followed by
an extract of a blues song.
We hope that the principles and techniques you learn as part of this guide help you become
familiar with common operations and feel more confident when working on your own projects.
This guide introduces you to the following:
● The user interface and its most important parts
● The different modes in Dorico and their functions
● Setting up a project
● Writing music and adding the notations required to produce a short piano piece and some
additional common notations in a separate piece
● Laying out and formatting pages, including adjusting notations such as beam grouping and
stem directions
● Playing back music and adjusting playback
● Printing and exporting
The piano piece used in these tasks is Dora Pejačević’s “Walzer-Capricen No. 2”. A PDF of the full
piece is available on steinberg.help for your reference.
Within a relatively short duration, this piece contains many notations common to most musical
styles, such as dynamics and articulations, as well as notes in multiple voices simultaneously,
chords, and cross-staff beaming. Other common notations not included in this piece, such as
lyrics and chord symbols, are in a separate section at the end of the guide.
NOTE
● Screenshots in this guide show Dorico Pro. Tasks are possible in all product versions unless
stated otherwise.
● For further information about anything mentioned in this guide, see the Operation Manual.
Tour of the user interface
In Dorico, the user interface is everything within the project window. Its basic structure is the
same in all modes.
The project window looks like this and consists of the following areas:
4
Dorico 3.5.121 Toolbar
The toolbar is located at the top of the project window.
On the left of the toolbar, there are the buttons for the different modes. By changing the
mode, you change the workspace and the available panels. The button for the current mode
appears highlighted. You can find out more about modes in the next topic.
NOTE
Dorico Elements and Dorico SE do not have an Engrave button as they do not have Engrave
mode.
In the middle of the toolbar, there is the layout selector, which allows you to change the
layout shown in the music area, and buttons to show/hide panels and tabs.
On the right of the toolbar, there are buttons for hiding/showing the Video, Mixer, and
Transport windows and a mini transport with playback and recording controls.
2 Tab bar
The tab bar is located towards the top of the project window, between the toolbar and the
music area. It is available in Setup, Write, and Engrave modes.
The tab bar shows the tabs that are currently open, the name of the layout open in each
tab, and allows you to open more tabs. If you split the music area and open several tabs, tab
groups are shown.
3 Project start area/Music area/Event display/Print preview area
The central part of the project window where you work on your project. When you set up
a new empty project, this area in Setup, Write, and Engrave modes shows the project start
area that allows you to add your first players.
Once you have added a player or an ensemble, this area becomes the music area that
displays the scores and instrumental parts that you create.
Introduction
Tour of the user interface
5
Dorico 3.5.12In Play mode, this area contains an event display, in which every note is displayed as an
event on a piano roll or drum editor, and shows the effects of manipulating the playback of
your music.
In Print mode, this area becomes the print preview area, which shows a preview of how
layouts will appear when printed onto paper or exported into a graphics file format.
TIP
Scores and instrumental parts are known as “layouts” in Dorico. Layouts allow you to show
different presentations of your music. In a project with separate instrumental parts, such as
a string quartet, you can switch between showing the full score layout and each part layout
in the current tab. You can have as many or as few tabs open as you want.
4 Toolboxes
Toolboxes are the columns on the left and right edges of the project window. They contain
different tools and options according to the current mode. Toolboxes allow you to input and
modify notes, notation items, and frames, and to determine which options are shown in their
corresponding panels.
You cannot hide toolboxes, they are always shown.
5 Panels
Panels are areas on the left, right, and bottom edges of the project window. They contain
a variety of functions, options, and notations that you need to create and edit your music,
depending on the mode. For example, the left panel in Write mode is the Notes panel, which
contains durations for notes, common accidentals, slurs, and articulations.
You can hide and show panels either individually or together. To hide/show all panels, click
Hide/Restore Panels in the toolbar. To hide/show individual panels, press Ctrl/Cmd-7
for the left panel, Ctrl/Cmd-8 for the bottom panel, and Ctrl/Cmd-9 for the right panel.
6 Status bar
The status bar is the strip at the bottom of the project window. It allows you to change the
rhythmic grid resolution , choose different views and page arrangements for the
music area, change the zoom, and displays information about your current selection, such as
the bar number in which you have selected a note. It contains different options in different
modes.
Functions of the modes
In Dorico, there are different modes: Setup, Write, Engrave, Play, and Print. Each mode
represents a different phase in the workflo w of preparing scores and parts, so they contain
different toolboxes, panels, and functionality from each other.
Setup mode
In Setup mode, you can set up the fundamental elements of the project: instruments
and the players that hold them, flo ws, layouts, and videos. You can also determine how
they interact with each other, for example, by changing the players assigned to layouts.
You can view music in the music area and switch between viewing other tabs and
layouts, but you cannot select or interact with anything in the music area in Setup
mode.
Write mode
In Write mode, you can input and edit your music, including changing the rhythmic
positions of items, changing the pitch of notes, and deleting notes and items. The
Introduction
Functions of the modes
6
Dorico 3.5.12available toolboxes and panels allow you to input all the notes and notation items that
are most commonly used.
By design, you cannot move notes and items graphically on the page in Write mode.
Graphical adjustments are only possible in Engrave mode.
Engrave mode (Dorico Pro only)
In Engrave mode, you can make fine adjustments to the music that you input in Write
mode and determine how the pages of your project are laid out.
Because Engrave mode is focused on the formatting and appearance of layouts, you
cannot delete any notes or items, change their rhythmic positions, or change the pitch
of notes in Engrave mode.
Play mode
In Play mode, you can change how your music sounds in playback. You can do this by
changing the playback template and assigning VST instruments, inputting automation,
adjusting the mix, and changing the sounding duration of notes in playback without
affecting their notated duration.
Print mode
In Print mode, you can print your layouts or export them as graphics files. When
printing layouts, you can specify the paper size and other options, such as duplex or
booklet printing. When exporting layouts, you can specify different graphics file types,
such as PDF or PNG, and the information you want to include in their exported file
names.
You can switch between the modes at any time in any of the following ways:
● Press Ctrl/Cmd plus one of the numbers 1 to 5 ( Ctrl/Cmd-1 for Setup, Ctrl/Cmd-2 for
Write, Ctrl/Cmd-3 for Engrave, Ctrl/Cmd-4 for Play, Ctrl/Cmd-5 for Print).
● Click the corresponding button in the toolbar.
● Choose Window > [mode].
Dorico projects
A project is an individual file that contains all required musical information, including multiple
instruments, their music, and playback settings.
In Dorico, separate spans of music are known as “flo ws” . A flo w could be a single song in an
album, a movement in a sonata or symphony, a number in a stage musical, or a short scale or
sight-reading exercise of only a few bars in length. A single project can contain any number of
flo ws and each flo w can use any combination of players. For example, if brass players are tacet in
one movement, you can remove them from that flo w but keep them in other flo ws.
Players represent musicians who hold instruments. A solo player represents a single person who
can play one or more instruments, such as a clarinettist who doubles on alto saxophone or a
percussionist with various percussion instruments. A section player represents multiple people
who all play the same instrument, such as a violin section in an orchestra or a soprano section
in a choir. Section players can only hold a single instrument, but they can be divided into smaller
units and onto multiple staves in Dorico Pro.
Layouts combine the musical content of flo ws and players with page formatting to produce
paginated music notation. You can have any number of layouts in a single project with any
combination of players and flo ws. For example, you can include a rehearsal piano player in the
vocal score layout without showing them in the full score. Different layouts can have different
page sizes and margins, for example, but also different appearances of notations. Full score and
part layouts have different default settings.
Introduction
Dorico projects
7
Dorico 3.5.12Key commands
Key commands are sets of keys that perform defined tasks when pressed together. They are
also known as “keyboard shortcuts” or “hotkeys”. Many key commands are the same on different
operating systems but some are not, and this guide distinguishes them.
When key commands use equivalent modifier keys depending on the operating system, the
modifier keys are indicated separated by a slash, with the Windows modifier key first and the
macOS modifier key second.
EXAMPLE
Ctrl/Cmd-Alt/Opt-Down Arrow means: press Ctrl – Alt – Down Arrow on Windows, Cmd – Opt –
Down Arrow on macOS.
When key commands require entirely different keys depending on the operating system, they are
indicated with the Windows key command first, followed by the macOS key command.
EXAMPLE
Ctrl (Windows) or Opt (macOS) means: press Ctrl on Windows, Opt on macOS.
Dorico provides multiple ways of inputting many items in order to cater for users who prefer
to use the mouse for input as well as those who prefer only to use their computer keyboard.
This guide focuses on using the keyboard in order to provide a simpler sequence of steps for
you to follow, and because Dorico’s key commands have been designed to be both logical and
accessible using a standard computer keyboard without needing a number pad. However, this
guide also includes references to the mouse input methods along the way.
EXAMPLE
The arrow keys on their own navigate the selection around the music area. Adding Alt/Opt
to the arrow keys moves notes and items rhythmically in Write mode and a small amount
graphically in Engrave mode. For example, Alt/Opt-Up Arrow / Alt/Opt-Down Arrow transpose
notes up/down by staff position. Adding Ctrl/Cmd as well moves notes and items by a larger
amount. For example, Ctrl/Cmd-Alt/Opt-Up Arrow / Ctrl/Cmd-Alt/Opt-Down Arrow transpose
notes up/down by octave.
Introduction
Key commands
8
Dorico 3.5.12Setting up the project
To walk you through setting up the project for this solo piano piece, the following tasks cover
starting a new project, adding a piano to it, and deleting the spare part layout.
Starting a new project
The first step in producing a piece in Dorico is to start a new project. These steps describe
starting an empty project so you can learn how to add individual instruments and players
yourself.
PREREQUISITE
You have installed and opened Dorico.
PROCEDURE
● Press Ctrl/Cmd-N to start a new project.
● You can also choose File > New.
RESULT
A new project window opens.
New empty projects start in Setup mode. This allows you to add players and instruments straight
away. Once you have added at least one player, the project start area in the middle becomes the
music area and shows staves.
On the left, the Players panel is where all the players in the project are listed. It’s currently
empty, as you haven’t added any players yet.
9
Dorico 3.5.12On the right, the Layouts panel shows a Full score layout card. This layout is automatically
created in every new project.
At the bottom of the window is the Flows panel. All the flo ws in your project are shown here.
TIP
Dorico provides project templates with different sets of players already included, such as a string
quartet or SSAATTBB choir.
Adding a solo piano player
The piece you are replicating is for solo piano, so you need to add a single solo player and assign
a piano instrument to them.
PROCEDURE
1. Press Shift-P to add a new solo player and open the instrument picker.
● You can also click Add Solo Player in the project start area.
2. Enter piano into the instrument picker search box.
3. Click Add or press Return .
RESULT
You have added a solo player and assigned a piano instrument to them. In the music area, the
required piano staves and their respective clefs appear.
In the Layouts panel on the right of the window, there is now a piano part layout in addition to
the existing full score layout. Dorico automatically creates a part layout for every player you add
to the project.
Setting up the project
Adding a solo piano player
10
Dorico 3.5.12Deleting the spare layout
As this piece only involves one player, you can delete the part layout created by default and just
keep the full score. In projects that contain a single player, you might find that having only one
layout makes it easier to keep track of your work.
PROCEDURE
1. In the Layouts panel on the right, select the Piano layout.
2. Press Backspace or Delete .
● You can also click Delete Layout in the action bar at the bottom of the panel.
RESULT
The piano part layout is deleted, leaving only the full score layout.
AFTER COMPLETING THIS TASK
We recommend saving your project.
Setting up the project
Deleting the spare layout
11
Dorico 3.5.12Writing music
Now that you have set up your project, you can start writing the music. The following tasks take
you through inputting the notes and notation items required for this piano piece, with a separate
task for each item for clarity, although Dorico is designed so that you can also input most items
at the same time as inputting notes and other notations: you don’t have to stop note input to add
a dynamic, for example.
Other common notations not included in this piece, such as lyrics and chord symbols, are in a
separate section at the end of the guide.
Some steps involve performing actions in specific bars. The bar number of the currently selected
item is shown in the status bar at the bottom of the window. The system track (the translucent
gray line above the system) also displays every bar number; you can hide/show the system track
by pressing Alt/Opt-T . Alternatively, you can show bar numbers for every bar in the music by
pressing Ctrl/Cmd-Shift-L to open Layout Options, clicking Bar Numbers in the category list
on the left of the dialog, then choosing Every bar for Show bar numbers in the Frequency
subsection.
Popovers
During the following tasks, you will be using popovers to input notations such as key signatures
and dynamics. Popovers are temporary value fields that appear above the staff and allow you to
input different items and perform tasks using text entries.
There are specific popovers for different purposes, such as inputting key signatures or adding
notes specific intervals above existing notes. You can only use popovers in Write mode.
The dynamics popover with an example entry
One of the key benefits of popovers is that you can use them as you input notes: once you
reach the position where you want to input a new time signature, for example, you can open the
time signatures popover using its key command, input the time signature you want, and then
continue inputting notes.
Although specific entries are required for many notations, the correct entries for different
notations are consistently and logically structured. For example, tuplets are always expressed
as a ratio, such as 3:2 or 5:4. Key signatures are expressed using upper case letters for major
keys and lower case letters for minor keys. Time signatures are expressed as a pair of separated
numbers; common time signatures use a slash, such as 3/4 or 6/8.
You can identify popovers by the icon on their left-hand side, which are the same icons used in
the Notations toolbox on the right of the window. The Notations toolbox allows you to hide/show
the corresponding notation’s panel, which is another way you can input notations if you prefer to
use the mouse.
12
Dorico 3.5.12Adding a key signature
All new projects in Dorico start with no key signature, which is treated as atonal, that is, without
an implied tonality. This piece is in A♭ major, so you need to input a key signature.
PREREQUISITE
● You must be in Write mode. If you are, Write in the toolbar appears highlighted. If you are
not, press Ctrl/Cmd-2 or click Write in the toolbar to switch to Write mode.
● If you want to zoom in, you can do so by, for example, pressing Ctrl/Cmd-= or Z or using the
zoom options in the status bar at the bottom of the project window.
PROCEDURE
1. Click the rest on the top staff.
2. Press Shift-K to open the key signatures popover.
3. Enter Ab into the popover.
● Upper case letters indicate major key signatures, lower case letters indicate minor key
signatures. You can also enter b for flat and # for sharp.
4. Press Return to close the popover.
RESULT
An A♭ major key signature is input at the start of the rest, which is the start of the flo w . It is
automatically positioned to the right of the initial clefs.
Writing music
Adding a key signature
13
Dorico 3.5.12TIP
You can also add key signatures using the Key Signatures, Tonality Systems, and Accidentals
panel on the right of the window, which you can show by clicking Key Signatures, Tonality
Systems, and Accidentals in the Notations toolbox. Instead of opening the popover, you can
click the down arrow in the Key Signatures section until the display has four flats, make sure
Major is selected, and then click the key signature to input it.
Adding a time signature
All new Dorico projects start with no time signature by default. As this piece is in 3/4, it requires a
time signature.
You can input notes without a time signature, but you can only add extra bars once you have
input a time signature so Dorico knows how long the bars should be. You can change and
delete time signatures at any time: Dorico moves barlines and adjusts how notes are notated
accordingly.
PROCEDURE
1. Click the rest on the top staff.
2. Press Shift-M to open the time signatures popover.
3. Enter 3/4 into the popover.
4. Press Return to close the popover.
RESULT
A 3/4 time signature is input at the rhythmic position of the selected rest, which is the start of the
flo w . It is automatically shown to the right of both the initial clefs and key signature. There is now
a single bar’s worth of rhythmic space in the flo w .
TIP
You can also add time signatures using the Time Signatures (Meter) panel on the right of the
window, which you can show by clicking Time Signatures (Meter) in the Notations toolbox.
Writing music
Adding a time signature
14
Dorico 3.5.12Adding bars
Dorico automatically creates bars when you reach the end of the last bar as you input notes.
However, it can be helpful to have all the bars you will need in advance.
PREREQUISITE
You must have input the time signature so Dorico knows how long the bars should be.
PROCEDURE
1. Select the rest on the top staff.
● You can select items by clicking them or by using the keyboard. If nothing is selected in
the music area, pressing any of the arrow keys selects the first note/rest on the top staff.
Right Arrow / Left Arrow move the selection along notes on one staff, Up Arrow /
Down Arrow move the selection up/down notes in chords and to staves above/below.
Tab switches the selection to other types of items at the same position, such as from a
note to a dynamic or slur.
2. Press Shift-B to open the bars and barlines popover.
3. Enter 73 into the popover.
4. Press Return to close the popover.
RESULT
73 bars are added, bringing the total number of bars in the flo w to 74, the number required
for this piece. They are currently spaced narrowly because they are empty, but Dorico will
automatically adjust their width as you input notes.
AFTER COMPLETING THIS TASK
Using the key signatures popover ( Shift-K ), input a key signature change to D♭ major in bar 33,
and another back to A♭ major in bar 43 using the popover entries Db and Ab respectively. Dorico
automatically shows double barlines at the key signature changes.
Writing music
Adding bars
15
Dorico 3.5.12Caret
During the following tasks, you will be using the caret to input notes. In Dorico, the caret is a
vertical line that shows the rhythmic position at which notes, chords, or notation items are input.
The caret has a note symbol beside it, which indicates the stem direction and type of the
currently selected voice. It has a + symbol if the voice is new.
The appearance and behavior of the caret changes depending on the input mode and the
currently selected voice number. For example, when you are inputting notes, the caret advances
to the next rhythmic position automatically after each note, but when inputting chords or notes
on tablature, the caret does not advance automatically. The caret also looks different when
inputting grace notes or notes into a slash voice, and when Insert or Chord mode is activated.
Inputting the melody on the top staff
In this piece, the melody is on the top, treble staff. For the first few bars of the melody, you need
to input individual notes in sequence.
PROCEDURE
1. In bar 1, select the rest on the top staff.
2. Press Shift-N to start note input.
● You can tell you are in note input when the caret is activated and appears on the staff.
Lines indicating the rhythmic grid also appear above the staff when the caret is active.
In the Notes panel on the left of the window, the quarter note button is highlighted. This
indicates the note duration that will be used for the next notes you input. Quarter note
(crotchet) is the default note duration when you start note input.
● However, the first four notes in the melody in this piece are eighth notes.
3. Press 5 to select eighth notes (quavers).
● The key commands for note durations use the numbers at the top of your computer
keyboard, although you can also use a number pad. 6 is quarter notes (crotchets),
Writing music
Caret
16
Dorico 3.5.12with smaller numbers used for smaller durations and larger numbers used for larger
durations.
● The caret is still at the beginning of the bar, but the first note in the melody is on the
second beat. However, you don’t need to input rests to get there.
4. Press Space twice to advance the caret two eighth notes.
● During note input, Space advances the caret by the note duration currently selected in
the Notes panel.
5. Press F , then G , then A , then B to input the corresponding pitches.
● The four notes are input as eighth notes starting from the caret position. Dorico
automatically beams the notes and shows a quarter note rest at the start of the bar.
● Dorico uses the letters A-G on your computer keyboard for note pitches. Notes with
accidentals in the key signature automatically follow the key signature unless you specify
otherwise. So when you press A and B , an A♭ and B♭ are input.
● The next note is a dotted half note, not an eighth note.
6. Press 7 to select half notes (minims), then . (period) to add a rhythm dot, making the
duration dotted half notes.
NOTE
You must press . on your computer keyboard, not a numeric keypad.
7. Press G to input a dotted half note G.
● Dorico automatically selects notes the smallest interval away from the previous note, so
here the G is input a third below, rather than a sixth above, the preceding B.
8. Repeat steps 3 to 7 for bars 3-4.
Writing music
Inputting the melody on the top staff
17
Dorico 3.5.12TIP
Alternatively, you can press Esc to stop note input, select bars 1-2 on the top staff (including
the quarter note rest), then press R to repeat the material directly after itself.
9. Press Esc or Return to stop note input.
RESULT
You have input all the notes required in the first four bars for the top staff.
TIP
You can also input notes by clicking on staves when the caret is active and Select in the Notes
toolbox is deactivated, or by playing them on a connected MIDI keyboard.
AFTER COMPLETING THIS TASK
Continue inputting notes on the top staff using what you have learned in this task up until the
end of bar eight. To input the low F at the start of bar 7 after the high F at the end of bar 6, press
Ctrl-Alt-F (Windows) or Ctrl-F (macOS) . If you input a higher F instead, press Ctrl/Cmd-Alt/
Opt-Down Arrow to transpose it down an octave.
Changing the beam grouping will be covered in a later task.
Inputting the chords on the bottom staff
Inputting notes on top of each other to create chords is very similar to inputting notes in
sequence (in that the caret must be active), but the input behavior is slightly different.
PROCEDURE
1. In bar 1, select the rest on the bottom staff.
2. Press Shift-N to start note input.
3. Press Q to start chord input.
● Chord input allows you to input multiple notes at the same position, that is, the caret
position. In chord input, a + sign appears at the top of the caret.
● You can also start chord input by clicking Chords in the Notes toolbox on the left of
the window.
Writing music
Inputting the chords on the bottom staff
18
Dorico 3.5.12● As in the previous task, the default note duration of a quarter note (crotchet) is selected
in the Notes panel. In this piece, the chords in the first few bars are all quarter notes, so
you don’t need to change the duration.
4. Press A to input an A♭.
● Because this is the first pitch on the staff, Dorico has no reference for register and
chooses the A♭ closest to middle C, but this piece requires the A♭ below.
5. Press Ctrl/Cmd-Alt/Opt-Down Arrow to transpose the selected A♭ down an octave.
● Alt/Opt-Down Arrow transposes notes down by staff position, that is, by step. Adding
Ctrl/Cmd transposes notes down a larger amount, that is, by octave.
6. Press E to input an E♭.
● In chord input, Dorico adds new notes above the previous note by default.
7. Press Space to advance the caret.
● In chord input, the caret does not advance automatically, allowing you to build notes
into chords at a single rhythmic position. Dorico expects chord input to continue until
you stop it.
● Because the note duration currently selected is a quarter note, pressing Space
advances the caret forward a quarter note.
● Now that Dorico has the first chord for pitch reference, the next A♭ would be input in the
same octave as the first chord by default, which is not what the piece requires.
8. Press Shift-Alt/Opt-A to input the A♭ above the note at the bottom of the previous chord,
then press C then E to input the corresponding pitches as a chord above the A♭.
Writing music
Inputting the chords on the bottom staff
19
Dorico 3.5.12● Dorico automatically selects notes the smallest interval away from the previous note.
Pressing Shift-Alt/Opt as well as the letter for the note inputs that note above the
previous note, regardless of the interval. For a lower note, it’s Ctrl-Alt (Windows) or
Ctrl (macOS) plus the letter for the note. If you’re not sure whether you need to specify
the register, you can always transpose notes up/down octaves after inputting them.
9. Press Space to advance the caret.
10. Press A , then C , then E to input the corresponding pitches as a chord.
● The next bar is very similar to the first bar. However, it starts with the lower A♭ again.
11. Press Space to advance the caret.
12. Press Ctrl-Alt-A (Windows) or Ctrl-A (macOS) to input the A♭ below the note at the bottom
of the previous chord, then press E to input an E♭ above the A♭.
13. Press Space to advance the caret.
14. Press B to input a B♭, then Ctrl/Cmd-Alt/Opt-Up Arrow to transpose the B♭ up an octave.
15. Press D , then E to input the corresponding pitches above the B♭.
16. Press Space to advance the caret.
17. Press B , then D , then E .
18. Press Space to advance the caret.
19. Repeat steps 4 to 17 to input bars 3-4.
TIP
Alternatively, you can press Esc to stop note input, select bars 1-2 on the bottom staff, then
press R to repeat the material directly after itself.
20. Press Esc or Return to stop note input.
RESULT
You have input all the chords required in the first four bars for the bottom staff.
Writing music
Inputting the chords on the bottom staff
20
Dorico 3.5.12AFTER COMPLETING THIS TASK
Continue inputting chords on the bottom staff up until beat 1 in bar 6, as accidentals are
required on beat 2 in bar 6.
Adding accidentals
So far, all the notes you have input have followed the accidentals in the key signature of A♭ major.
However, the chords in bar 6 include B♮ and D♮, so you need to add accidentals.
PREREQUISITE
On the Note Input and Editing page in Preferences (key command Ctrl/Cmd-, ), you have
chosen Before inputting note for Specify accidental, rhythm dot and articulations.
PROCEDURE
1. In bar 6, select the quarter note rest on beat 2 on the bottom staff.
2. Press Shift-N to start note input.
3. If chord input is not already active, press Q to start chord input.
● The F at the bottom of the chord does not need an accidental, but following on from the
previous chord, the default register of the next F you input is a third below the A♭ on
beat 1, rather than the sixth above that is required here.
4. Press Shift-Alt/Opt-F to input an F in the correct, higher octave.
● The next two pitches both require a natural accidental, so you need to prepare the
accidental before inputting each note.
5. Press 0 to select a natural accidental.
● You must press 0 on your computer keyboard, not a numeric keypad.
● You can also select a natural accidental by clicking Natural in the Notes panel on the left
of the window.
6. Press B to input a B♮.
● Accidentals only apply to one note. You must reselect a natural accidental for the D♮.
7. Press 0 to select a natural accidental.
Writing music
Adding accidentals
21
Dorico 3.5.128. Press D to input a D♮.
9. Press Space to advance the caret.
10. Press F , then B , then D to input the corresponding pitches.
● Because accidentals last for the rest of the bar by default, the next B and D are also input
as B♮ and D♮ automatically.
11. Press Esc or Return to stop note input.
RESULT
You have input chords each containing two notes with natural accidentals. The natural
accidentals are automatically hidden on the second chord because the default accidental
duration rule in Dorico is common practice, where accidentals apply until the end of the bar.
Similarly, the B♭ in bar 7 on the top staff shows a cautionary flat accidental automatically.
TIP
● You can also add accidentals to selected notes outside of note input. Sometimes this is more
helpful, as you can add the same accidental to multiple notes at once.
For a flat accidental, press – . For a sharp accidental, press = . On an English keyboard, these
keys have – (minus) and + (plus) on them respectively, which might help you remember them:
minus lowers notes while plus raises notes. 0 for natural represents no alteration.
You can find more accidentals in the Key Signatures, Tonality Systems, and Accidentals
panel on the right of the window, which you can show by clicking Key Signatures, Tonality
Systems, and Accidentals in the Notations toolbox.
● For more information about accidental duration rules, see the Operation Manual. In Dorico
Elements and Dorico SE, you cannot change the accidental duration rule.
AFTER COMPLETING THIS TASK
Continue inputting chords on the bottom staff using what you have learned in this task and the
previous task up until the first beat of bar 14, without the arpeggio signs: you will add those in a
later task.
Adding another voice to the top staff
In bar 9, a second voice appears on the top staff, so you need to add an additional voice to the
staff. We will also explain how you can identify the voice into which you are inputting notes.
PROCEDURE
1. In bar 9, select the rest on the top staff.
2. Press Shift-N to start note input.
● Beside the caret, there is a note symbol. This indicates the voice to which anything you
then input is assigned by showing its stem direction, a number, and type (normal, slash,
or grace).
Writing music
Adding another voice to the top staff
22
Dorico 3.5.12● Currently, the note symbol shows you are inputting notes into the first up-stem voice on
the staff, but this bar requires a down-stem voice.
3. If chord input is active, press Q to stop chord input.
4. Press Shift-V to create a new voice.
● A + sign appears beside the note symbol, whose stem now points down. This indicates a
new down-stem voice.
5. Press 7 to select half notes (minims), then . (period) to add a rhythm dot, making the
duration dotted half notes.
6. Press B to input a B♭ in the new down-stem voice.
● Dorico shows a cautionary ♭ accidental on the B due to the B♮s on the bottom staff in the
previous bar.
● The caret automatically advances to the next bar. However, in this instance, there are
still other notes in the up-stem voice in bar 9 that you need to input.
7. Press Left Arrow until the caret is positioned at the start of the second beat in bar 9.
● When moving the caret using the arrow keys, how far it moves depends on the current
rhythmic grid resolution (rather than the note duration selected in the Notes panel when
you press Space ). The current rhythmic grid resolution is shown in the status
bar at the bottom of the window. By default, it’s set to eighth notes.
● The note symbol beside the caret indicates that it’s still set to the down-stem voice, but
the eight notes in bar 9 are in the up-stem voice.
8. Press V to switch to the up-stem voice.
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Adding another voice to the top staff
23
Dorico 3.5.12● V cycles through all active voices on the staff. As there are currently only two voices on
the top staff, pressing V switches between the up-stem and down-stem voices.
9. Press 5 to select eighth notes (quavers).
10. Press E , G , F , then E to input the pitches E♭, G, F, and E♭ as eighth notes into the up-stem
voice.
11. Press 7 then . (period) to select dotted half notes (dotted minims).
12. Press Q to start chord input.
13. Press Ctrl-Alt-A (Windows) or Ctrl-A (macOS) to input the A♭ a fifth below, rather than a
fourth above, the preceding E♭, then D to input the D♭ above as a dotted half note chord into
the up-stem voice.
14. At the start of bar 11, press V to switch to the down-stem voice
15. Repeat steps 5 to 13 to input bars 11-12.
TIP
Alternatively, you can press Esc to stop note input, select bars 9-10 on the top staff, then
press R to repeat the material directly after itself.
16. Press Esc or Return to stop note input.
RESULT
You have added a new down-stem voice and input all the notes required in bars 9-12 for the
top staff. The order in which you input notes for each voice doesn’t matter: Dorico automatically
updates stem directions and voice columns to accommodate voices.
Writing music
Adding another voice to the top staff
24
Dorico 3.5.12AFTER COMPLETING THIS TASK
Input the notes in bar 13 on the top staff using what you have learned in this task, or copy them
from bar 11.
Adding slurs
Most phrases in this piece have slurs. This task starts by adding slurs to the phrases you have
already input, then describes inputting a slur alongside new notes.
PROCEDURE
1. In bar 1, click anywhere on the eighth note beam on the top staff to select all notes in the
beam.
2. Press S to add a slur across the selected notes.
● You can also add slurs by clicking Slur in the Notes panel on the left of the window.
3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for each phrase that requires a slur, up to the end of bar 8.
● The slur across bars 9-10 joins notes in different voices, so you have to select these
notes differently.
4. In bar 9, select the down-stem note.
5. Ctrl/Cmd -click at least one note in bar 10 on the top staff.
6. Press S to add a slur between the selected notes.
Writing music
Adding slurs
25
Dorico 3.5.127. Repeat steps 4 to 6 for the other cross-voice slurs in bars 11-13.
● If you have Dorico Pro, in a later task you can flip these slurs and adjust their shape so
they start on the rests.
● This is as far as you have input notes, so now you can input notes and slurs together.
8. Select the rest in bar 14 on the top staff.
9. Press Shift-N to start note input.
10. If the note symbol beside the caret is down-stem, press V to switch to the up-stem voice.
11. If chord input is active, press Q to stop chord input.
12. Press 5 to select eighth notes (quavers).
13. Press S to start a slur.
14. Input the notes under the first slur, up to the first eighth note (quaver) in bar 17.
15. Press Shift-S to stop the slur without stopping note input.
16. Press F to input the F at the start of the next phrase.
17. Press S to start another slur on the currently selected note, that is, the F you just input.
18. Input the notes under the second slur, up to the end of bar 17.
19. Press 7 to select half notes, then . (period) to add a rhythm dot, making the duration dotted
half notes.
20. Press G .
Writing music
Adding slurs
26
Dorico 3.5.1221. Press Shift-S to stop the slur.
22. Press Esc or Return to stop note input.
RESULT
You have added slurs to existing phrases, including cross-voice slurs, and input slurs alongside
inputting notes.
AFTER COMPLETING THIS TASK
You can copy the music on both staves in bars 3-4 into bars 19-20.
Inputting a tie
There is a tie that joins two notes on the bottom staff across the barline between bars 14 and 15.
In these steps you will input that tie.
PROCEDURE
1. In bar 14, select the quarter note (crotchet) rest on beat 3 on the bottom staff.
2. Press Shift-N to start note input.
3. If chord input is not already active, press Q to start chord input.
4. Press 7 to select half notes (minims).
● We do mean half notes, despite the caret being at the last quarter note in the bar.
5. Press D to input a half note D♭.
● Ta-dah! The half note D♭ automatically appears as two tied quarter notes.
6. Press Ctrl/Cmd-Alt/Opt-Up Arrow to transpose it up an octave.
Writing music
Inputting a tie
27
Dorico 3.5.127. Press 6 to select quarter notes (crotchets).
8. Press F , then Space to advance the caret.
9. Press – to select a flat accidental, then F to input an F♭.
10. Press Esc or Return to stop note input.
RESULT
You have input a half note (minim) that is displayed as two tied quarter notes (crotchets). Dorico
treats it as a single note, meaning if you click either notehead, both are selected.
TIP
In Dorico, in most cases you don’t need to input ties: simply select the total duration of the note,
and Dorico splits it up into tied notes as appropriate for the time signature and its position in the
bar. This applies to beam grouping as well as note grouping. If you do need to tie notes together
manually, the key command is T ; to remove ties, the key command is U .
AFTER COMPLETING THIS TASK
You can input the rest of the notes on the bottom staff up to the end of bar 18. We recommend
inputting the E at the end of bar 15 as a D♮; you will learn how to respell notes in a later task.
Adding dynamics
This piece includes a number of different dynamics, including ones such as , which are known
as “immediate dynamics” in Dorico, and crescendo/diminuendo hairpins, which we collectively
name “gradual dynamics”. Like slurs, you can add dynamics to existing music as well as inputting
them during note input.
You can also input a slur during this task by starting the slur after step 13 and ending it between
inputting the two Fs in step 17.
PROCEDURE
1. In bar 1, select the quarter note rest on the treble clef.
2. Press Shift-D to open the dynamics popover.
3. Enter mp into the popover.
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Adding dynamics
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Dorico 3.5.124. Press Return to close the popover and input the  dynamic.
5. In bar 5, click the eighth note G on the top staff.
6. Press < (that is, Shift - , ) to input a crescendo hairpin that spans the selected note, that is, an eighth note in duration. ● Dorico uses the < and > characters for crescendo and diminuendo hairpins respectively
due to their similar appearance.
● This hairpin should actually be longer, so you need to lengthen it.
7. Press Shift-Alt/Opt-Right Arrow to lengthen the hairpin up to beat 2 in bar 6.
● The number of presses required depends on your rhythmic grid resolution .
TIP
● You can also shorten hairpins by pressing Shift-Alt/Opt-Left Arrow . These key
commands apply to notes too, as well as all notations with duration, such as pedal lines,
slurs, and gradual tempo changes.
● If you select a range of notes and then input a gradual dynamic, it spans the selection
automatically.
● Now you can try inputting notes and dynamics at the same time.
8. In bar 21, select the bar rest on the top staff.
9. Press Shift-N to start note input.
Writing music
Adding dynamics
29
Dorico 3.5.1210. If chord input is active, press Q to stop chord input.
11. Press 5 to select eighth notes (quavers).
12. Press Space to advance the caret one eighth note, then press F to input an F.
● If you have not already input the phrase in bars 19-20, the F might be input in the wrong
octave. You can either press Ctrl-Alt-F (Windows) or Ctrl-F (macOS) to specify the
lower octave before you input it, or press Ctrl/Cmd-Alt/Opt-Down Arrow to transpose
it down an octave after inputting it.
13. Press < (that is, Shift - , ) to start a crescendo hairpin. ● The hairpin is not visible yet, as it has no duration until you have advanced the caret. It will appear and extend as you input notes. 14. Press G , A , B , C , D , then E to input the corresponding pitches. ● The hairpin extends as you input notes. Hairpins also extend when you press Space to advance the caret. 15. Press ? (that is, Shift - / ) to stop the hairpin. 16. Press 6 to select quarter notes (crotchets). 17. Press F twice to input two quarter note Fs. 18. Press Esc or Return to stop note input. RESULT You have added immediate and gradual dynamics to existing notes, and input gradual dynamics alongside inputting notes. TIP You can also add dynamics using the Dynamics panel on the right of the window, which you can show by clicking Dynamics in the Notations toolbox. Adding articulations This piece includes a number of different articulations, including marcato, tenuto, and staccato marks. You can add articulations to existing notes as well as inputting them alongside notes. PROCEDURE 1. Ctrl/Cmd -click the Gs in bars 2, 4, 18, and 20 on the top staff. 2. Press ` to add marcatos to all selected notes. Writing music Adding articulations 30 Dorico 3.5.12● You can also select articulations by clicking the corresponding button in the Notes panel on the left of the window. The key commands for articulations use the four keys to the left of the Return key on the computer keyboard, matching their arrangement in the Notes panel. Combining Shift with these keys allows you to access the lower four articulations in the panel. 3. Ctrl/Cmd -click the quarter note Fs on beat 3 in bars 6, 8, and 22. 4. Press ] to add staccatos to all selected notes. ● Now you can try inputting notes and articulations at the same time. The next articulation you need to input is at the end of bar 24, and because the phrase in bars 23-24 is the same as 21-22, you can copy most of it. 5. In bar 21, select the eighth note rest on the top staff. 6. Shift -click the F on beat 2 in bar 22 on the top staff to select everything on the top staff up to that note. 7. Alt/Opt -click the top staff at the start of bar 23. ● This copies the selected material to the closest position to the mouse pointer, as determined by the rhythmic grid resolution, without copying it to your clipboard. If your rhythmic grid resolution is very small, such as 32nd notes, you must be more precise where you Alt/Opt -click than if it’s set to a larger value, such as quarter notes. 8. In bar 24, select the quarter note rest on beat 3 on the top staff. 9. Press Shift-N to start note input. 10. Press ] to select staccatos. 11. Press F to input an F with a staccato. Writing music Adding articulations 31 Dorico 3.5.12● Articulations are sticky in Dorico, which means all notes you input have the selected articulations until you deactivate them or stop note input. This is different to accidentals, where the selected accidental only applies to the next note you input. 12. Press ] again to deactivate staccatos. ● The next steps skip ahead in the piece to demonstrate inputting consecutive notes with tenuto marks. 13. Press Ctrl/Cmd-Right Arrow to move the caret to the next bar for each press until it reaches the start of bar 39. 14. Press # (Windows) or (macOS) to select tenutos. 15. Press D , F , then B to input the corresponding pitches with tenuto articulations. ● There are also three quarter notes with tenuto marks on the bottom staff in this bar, so you need to move the caret back to input those notes too. 16. Press Ctrl/Cmd-Left Arrow to move the caret back a bar to the start of bar 39. 17. Press Down Arrow to move the caret to the bottom staff. 18. Press 0 to select a natural accidental, then G , F , then E to input the corresponding pitches with tenuto articulations. 19. Press Esc or Return to stop note input. RESULT You have added articulations to existing notes and input notes with articulations. Writing music Adding articulations 32 Dorico 3.5.12Adding arpeggio signs to chords Most of the chords in this piece are played straight, but a number are rolled, which is indicated with an arpeggio sign. You can add arpeggio signs to existing chords as well as inputting them alongside inputting notes. PREREQUISITE You have input all the chords in the bottom staff up to the end of bar 11. PROCEDURE 1. In bar 9, click the stem of the chord on beat 1 on the bottom staff to select all notes in the chord. ● Arpeggio signs apply automatically to all notes in the voice, so you can even select just a single note in the chord. ● You can only add arpeggio signs to a single chord at a time. 2. Press Shift-O to open the ornaments popover. 3. Enter arp into the popover. 4. Press Return to close the popover and input an arpeggio sign across all notes in the selected chord. 5. Repeat steps 1 to 4 for the chords on beat 1 in bars 11, 13, and 14. ● Now you can try inputting an arpeggio sign alongside a chord. 6. In bar 26, select the bar rest on the top staff. 7. Press Shift-N to start note input. 8. If chord input is not already active, press Q to start chord input. 9. Press Shift-O to open the ornaments popover. 10. Enter arp into the popover. 11. Press Return to close the popover and input an arpeggio sign at the rhythmic position of the caret. 12. Press A to input an A♭. Writing music Adding arpeggio signs to chords 33 Dorico 3.5.12● When you input the A♭, a short arpeggio sign appears to the left of the note. ● Based on the previous pitches in this voice on the staff, Dorico inputs the A♭ at the top of the chord. 13. Press Ctrl-Alt-E (Windows) or Ctrl-E (macOS) , then Ctrl-Alt-A (Windows) or Ctrl- A (macOS) to input the corresponding pitches below the top A♭. ● When you input the E♭ then another A♭ below, the arpeggio automatically extends across all three notes. 14. Press Esc or Return to stop note input. RESULT You have added arpeggio signs to existing chords and input an arpeggio sign alongside inputting a new chord. TIP You can also add arpeggio signs using the Ornaments panel on the right of the window, which you can show by clicking Ornaments in the Notations toolbox. Adding tempo marks Because this piece was composed in the Romantic era, it includes a fair amount of rubato. This is indicated in the music with relatively short fluctuations in tempo, including a ritardando followed by an a tempo, which you will input in this task. Now that you have completed several tasks, you have probably correctly worked out that you can input tempo marks both during note input and by adding them to existing music. During note input, they are input at the caret position. However, gradual tempo changes, such as accelerando, do not extend as you input notes. PROCEDURE 1. In bar 11, select any note on beat 2. ● Because tempo marks are system objects and apply to all systems in a layout, you can select notes on either staff that span the required duration. 2. Ctrl/Cmd -click the chord on beat 3 in bar 12. Writing music Adding tempo marks 34 Dorico 3.5.123. Press Shift-T to open the tempo popover. 4. Enter poco rit. into the popover. 5. Press Return to close the popover and input a poco rit. gradual tempo change that spans the selected range. ● A continuation line is automatically shown for its duration. The circular handles at the start and end control its rhythmic start and end positions. 6. In bar 13, select any of the notes or the rest on beat 1. 7. Press Shift-T to open the tempo popover. 8. Enter a tempo into the popover. 9. Press Return twice to select your entry and input it. Writing music Adding tempo marks 35 Dorico 3.5.12RESULT You have added a gradual tempo change and an absolute tempo change. Dorico automatically aligns the ritardando continuation line with the “A tempo” marking. TIP You can also add tempo marks using the Tempo panel on the right of the window, which you can show by clicking Tempo in the Notations toolbox. AFTER COMPLETING THIS TASK Using the tempo popover ( Shift-T ), input a Grazioso tempo mark at the start of bar 1. If you input the version with a suggested metronome mark, you can hide the metronome mark by selecting it and deactivating Metronome mark in the Tempo group of the Properties panel at the bottom of the window (press Ctrl/Cmd-8 to hide/show it). Dorico aligns the Grazioso tempo mark with the time signature automatically. Adding clef changes In this piece, the register on the staff changes drastically enough in some places to justify a change in clef. The first clef changes are at the end of the first section of the piece. PROCEDURE 1. In bar 28, select the rest on the top staff. 2. Press Shift-N to start note input. 3. If chord input is not already active, press Q to start chord input. 4. Press F , C , then F to input the corresponding pitches as a quarter note chord. 5. Press Space to advance the caret. 6. Press Shift-C to open the clefs and octave lines popover. 7. Enter bass into the popover. 8. Press Return to close the popover and input a bass clef at the caret position. 9. Continue inputting notes and chords on the top staff until the end of bar 29. ● To select flat accidentals for each F♭ on beat 3 in bar 28, press - . Writing music Adding clef changes 36 Dorico 3.5.12● When you add a chord in the down-stem voice on beat 3 in bar 29, rests appear on beats 1 and 2. In the next task, you can delete them. 10. Press Esc or Return to stop note input. 11. In bar 30, select the rest on the top staff. 12. Press Shift-C to open the clefs and octave lines popover. 13. Enter treble into the popover. 14. Press Return to close the popover and input a treble clef at the selected rhythmic position. RESULT You have input two clef changes plus the notes and chords required on the top staff in bars 28-29. TIP You can also add clefs using the Clefs panel on the right of the window, which you can show by clicking Clefs in the Notations toolbox. Deleting rests Dorico automatically shows rests between the notes you input, as appropriate for the prevailing time signature and their position in the bar. When using voices to notate passing notes, as in bar 29, rests in those voices are not always wanted. In such cases, you can delete rests. PROCEDURE 1. In bar 29, click on the staff to select all items in the bar. Writing music Deleting rests 37 Dorico 3.5.122. Choose Edit > Remove Rests.
RESULT
All rests within the selection are removed. This is done by automatically activating the Starts
voice and Ends voice properties in the Notes and Rests group of the Properties panel on the
required notes so that no rests are shown in the selected region.
Inputting tuplets
In bars 30-40, there are several different tuplets that you must input. Dorico allows you to input
tuplets with any ratio, including over barlines.
PROCEDURE
1. In bar 30, select the rest on the top staff.
2. Press Shift-N to start note input.
3. If chord input is active, press Q to stop chord input.
4. Press ; to open the tuplets popover.
5. Enter 5:4x into the popover.
● Tuplets are expressed as ratios: the number of notes in the tuplet, followed by the
number of normal notes the tuplet lasts for, separated by a colon. For example, 5:4
means five notes in the space of four (a quintuplet), 3:2 means three notes in the space
of two (a triplet). The letter after the ratio specifies the beat unit. For example, x for
16th notes, e for eighth notes, q for quarter notes. If you don’t specify the beat unit in
your popover entry, the tuplet is based on the note value currently selected in the Notes
panel.
6. Press Return to close the popover and input a 16th note (semiquaver) quintuplet.
Writing music
Inputting tuplets
38
Dorico 3.5.127. Press 4 to select 16th notes (semiquavers).
● You can input notes of any duration inside tuplets of any ratio. If the note is too long to
fit, any extra duration is notated beyond the tuplet.
8. Press F , D , Ctrl-Alt-G (Windows) or Ctrl-G (macOS) to input the G below, Shift-Alt/Opt-D
to input the D♭ above, then F .
● Tuplets are sticky in Dorico, which means you continue to input the specified tuplet until
you stop tuplet input or note input.
● Dorico shows a cautionary ♭ accidental on the first D due to the D♮s in the previous bar.
9. Press : (that is, Shift – ; ) to stop tuplet input.
● Shift – ; stops tuplet input just like Shift-S stops slurs and Shift – / stops gradual
dynamics.
10. Press 6 to select quarter notes (crotchets).
11. Press B , then C .
12. Repeat steps 4 to 11 for bar 31.
TIP
Alternatively, you can press Esc to stop note input, select bar 30 (without the treble clef),
press R to repeat the material directly after itself, then press Ctrl/Cmd-Alt/Opt-Up Arrow
to transpose it up an octave.
13. Press Esc or Return to stop note input.
● Now you can try inputting consecutive triplets.
14. In bar 40, select the rest on the bottom staff.
15. Press Shift-N to start note input.
16. Press ; to open the tuplets popover.
17. Enter 3:2e, for three eighth notes in the space of two, into the popover.
Writing music
Inputting tuplets
39
Dorico 3.5.1218. Press Return to close the popover and input an eighth note triplet.
19. Press 5 to select eighth notes (quavers).
20. Press A to input an A♭.
● Based on the preceding pitches, this inputs an A♭ that is two octaves too high.
21. Press Ctrl/Cmd-Alt/Opt-Down Arrow twice to transpose it down to the correct octave.
22. Press Shift-Alt/Opt-E to input the E♭ a fifth above, rather than a fourth below, the preceding
A♭, then A , C , E , then A to input the corresponding pitches as triplet eighth notes.
23. Press : (that is, Shift – ; ) to stop tuplet input.
24. Press Shift-C to open the clefs an

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