Leica – MD – User Manual

Category: Digital Camera, Film Camera, and Vintage Camera User Guides and Manuals

Download user manual for Leica – MD – User Manual 
Preview: Below is a preview of the manual as extracted from the PDF file


LEICA M-D
㉘⮹㉐ | Instructions
93692 II/16/AV/B
Leica Camera AG I Am Leitz-Park 5 I 35578 WETZLAR I DEUTSCHLAND
Telefon +49 (0) 6441-2080-0 I Telefax +49 (0) 6441-2080-333 I www.leica-camera.com1
10
12
11
9 9b
17
18
16
15
14
14a
9c
13a
9a
13
2
3
4
2
7
8
6
5
26
27
28
19 20
22
21b
21
21a
24
25
231
10
12
11
9 9b
17
18
16
15
14
14a
9c
13a
9a
13
2
3
4
2
7
8
6
5
26
27
28
19 20
22
21b
21
21a
24
25
23Leica M-D
KO
2
ἢẩẺKO
3
PVLSⴆ㥲⳿⇞ ⳮ⺪#⃹#ⱺⰒ⨲ⳮ㬿Ɫ⳿⇞KO
4
ᾓㄒKO
5
KO
6
⳪㱖#ⴆ㥲ⱂ#FH#⺇Ὧ☆᝾#HX#⺪㍒ⱂ#ጚ⇢#⭾ቖ▖㩗Ⱞ#ⷪ ✂㩒Ⱞ#ጚᵇ㩂ᇊ#Ⱳ➟ឲ៎1 ⷦⱂ#▖㩗 ⅿⳫ#ᇊ⺪▖㩗KO
7
ⳮጚ#⃹#ⳮⱺ#ⲏ㍂ⱂ#㢺ጚKO
8
≪㥲#Ὧ㍗ ⳿὞ ⯮⪺☆#⇢#ᾒ➟KO
9
ᦡ὞ ⃻὞᢮+㩂្#㏎ⅮṦ#ⲏㄓ㩆#▫㗆,KO
10
㔟#ცⱞᧆ ⷪ⌮㩞⩦#㩊#≪㥲= ⷪ⌮ᇦ⳿ ▖⺮#㈖⫫# ⱺ☢㩆#☎Ὧ☆ ⷪ⌮#ᇦ⳿ ⪞ፒ#ᔲⱂ#⫚ᆚKO
11
# ℚ㘚ẖ#㊓ⳮ ㄢᇊ=KO
12
ⷦⱂ▖㩗=KO
13
ㄢⵚ#▖㩗=KO
14
ℚ㘚ẖ2Ἶᾒẖ#㍞ᧆ#ሺ㆞ ⷻ⭾= 㩂្#㏎Ⅾ#≮ẖ 1
3
2
4
# ℚ㘚ẖṦ#▧Ɐ㩂⟗⟆⬎ # ℚ㘚ẖṦ#≮ẖ㩂⟗⟆⬎ 2
1KO
15
㊓ⳮ#▫㗆#㥆⟆# ㄢⵚ#▖㩗= # Ἶᾒẖ#㍞ᧆṦ#▧Ɐ㩂⟗⟆⬎ # Ἶᾒẖ#㍞ᧆ#≮ẖKO
16
▖⮓#ცត㩆#Ἶᾒẖ#㍞ᧆ ㄢᇊ= Ἶᾒẖ#㍞ᧆ#⮓Ჳ#㥆⟆ ㄢⵚ#▖㩗=

KO
17
OHLFD#P#ᳶ⹲ ⷻ⭾=KO
18
ⴆ㩆ᤆ#▖⮓
ㄢⵚ#▖㩗=#KO
19
ᳶ⹲#ⲏㄓ ᳶ⹲ⱂ#ⴆᅚ ㄢⵚ#▖㩗=KO
20
ⵚ⳿㖎 ἾⱢ#➎⯮㍂# 16 17
ㄢⵚ#▖㩗= ☾㘚KO
21
ㄢⵚ#▖㩗=
ㄢᇊ= # ⟆ხ#☎⳿#⡢㰊

KO
22
ጚ⇢#☎⳿ ᖊ⻆#⃹#⟆ხ ☎⳿ᾒᧆ#≲᳖⬎ጚ= ძძⱂ#ჼ#☎⳿= ჼ#ዢᷣხ#ⳮ㭂= ჼ#ዢᷣⱂ#✆☆ ☎⳿ᾒᧆ#ᖂცጚ=KO
23
LVR#ჺ᢮ ㄢᇊ= ᇊ⳿ᤆ#㍞Ἶᱦ#☎⳿KO
24
ᇻ#㧮ᳲⱮ#㌋⳿#㟶Ɫᠾ 22:45 PM 22.02.2012
999-9000
8234/9999 12MP
2.8 F 1/8000 12500 ISO EV
INFO
D EKO
25
# ⱞ⃢⺪#⫫⫗#☊㗇ጚ 68pp#.#468pp 22:45 PM 22.02.2012
999-9000
8234/9999 12MP
2.8 F 1/8000 12500 ISO EV
INFO
83pp#.#:8pp 22:45 PM 22.02.2012
999-9000
8234/9999 12MP
2.8 F 1/8000 12500 ISO EV
INFO
5;pp#.#<3pp 22:45 PM 22.02.2012 999-9000 8234/9999 12MP 2.8 F 1/8000 12500 ISO EV INFOKO 26 ᅚẖ#㌋⳿ ጚᆮⳫ#㌋⳿#ጚⷪ {#⋚#㟶Ɫᠾ#ℚ Ⱂ @#⟎ⴆ ㌋⳿#ጚⷪ ⱞ⃢⺪#㩓☛#ℓⅿKO 27 ⱞ⃢⺪#≮㩊#ℓⅿKO 28 ᙢ㊆#㌋⳿ ᙢ㊆#㌋⳿ᆮ#㐆ጚ2ᔮጚ ㄢⵚ#▖㩗=KO 29 ᙢ㊆#ᾒᧆ ⱺᣃ#⟆ხ#☎⳿ ㄢⵚ#▖㩗=#KO 30 ㌋⳿ჼ#⳪ⲏ ጚតⱂ#▖⮓ ᙢ㊆#⇞⳿ ᙢ㊆ⱂ#✂ᣃ#☎⳿KO 31 ㄢᇊ= B #☎⳿ ㄢⵚ#▖㩗= ㌋⳿#ⅾ⯮#ㇲᇦ#⃹#⃢៖KO 32 㧶ᲂ⟆#ᾒᧆ ▖⮓#ცត㩆#㧶ᲂ⟆#ⲏ㍂ 㧶ᲂ⟆#ⲏ㍂ⱂ#ⲏㄓ ㄢᇊ=KO 33 㧶ᲂ⟆#ᙢ㊆#㏒㞢ᵎ ㄢⵚ#▖㩗=KO 34 ㍞Ἶᱦ⪺#ⱂ㩞#ⴆ⪞ᤂ᝾#ⱺᣃ#㧶ᲂ⟆#ᾒᧆⱂ#☎⳿ ㄢᇊ= ⟆➎㙆⪺#Ⳬ㩓㩆#㧶ᲂ⟆#ⲏ㍂ც#ⲏㄓᤆ#㟶Ɫᠾⱂ#㧶ᲂ⟆#ᙢ ㊆#ⴆ⪞#᧾➎㧶ᳲⱞ ⱺᣃ#㧶ᲂ⟆#ᾒᧆⱂ#ᆧ⮚KO 35 㧶ᲂ⟆#ⲏ㍂ც#㏞㧒㘚#ⴆ⪞+D,#᫺᝾#✂ᣃ#ᾒᧆ+P,ᵆ#☎⳿ ᤆ#ᆧ⮚ ☊㫿#㧶ᲂ⟆#ᾒᧆ+ᇊ♷#ᣃጚ㬾, ⷻ⭾= ㄢⵚ#▖㩗= KO 36 ጚ㖪# ⱺᣃ#☾㘚#㈖⫫ ⷻ⭾= Ⲗ◇ ㏞㧒㘚ᵆ#ᡚⱞ㘚#ⳮ⚋ Ἶᾒẖ#㍞ᧆⱂ#ᡚⱞ㘚#ቖⵚ ᵆ⮚#ᡚⱞ㘚#ⱻ⪯#+GQJ, KO 37 㡶⯒⪞#⪯ᡚⱞ㞢#☎㍂ Ⳳㄒ= ᧾➎㧶ᳲⱞ ⋚#㟶Ɫᠾ#OHG 㮮὞#OHG UP UP bc Err KO 38 ⟆➎㙆#⩋☢☆ẖ ሺ㆞#ᳶ⹲ 㨮㘚 ㄢᇊ= ⃢᳖#⋚#㟶Ɫᠾ#P ⰊឲⅮ☎#ᇻძ#⋚#㟶Ɫᠾ#P ⋚#㟶Ɫᠾ#㬿៪ᆧ#P#4158{2P#417{KO 39 㧶ᲂ⟆#ⲏ㍂ ㄢᇊ= ⇞⳿#ᳶ⹲ ცℓ ⫲⌮#≪㥲 ⷦ•#ⅲ㬢 KO 40 ⨲ⳮ#⃹#ᇪẖ#ℓⅿ ⱦℂⳫⱢ#ⷦⱂ#▖㩗 ☦☆ ጪ#☆ẦKO 41 ᇪẖ#ℓⅿ ㍞Ἶᱦ#ᇪẖ ℚ㘚ẖ#ᇪẖ KO 42 ㊓ⳮጚ#ᇪẖ Ἶᾒẖ#㍞ᧆ#ᇪẖ KO 43 ☦☆#☢ㆃ ▖⮓ⱺც#⺫⳻#☢ㆃ㩊#✂᢮#Ⱳ➟ឲ៎= ㄢⵚ#▖㩗= KO 44 ⷻ⭾= ⇞ᇪ KO 45 ⬎ⱻᣃ#⃹#•ⴆ#㩞ᆚ ㍞ἾᱦṦ#㐚Ⱞ#ᨶ#ℂⰻⱞ#⪰➟ឲ៎1 ㍞ἾᱦṦ#㐆ⱺẲⱺ#᢮ᵆ#Ꭶ⺻ឲ៎1 ㍞ἾᱦṦ#ⱻᣃ⟆㖖#✂#⪰➟ឲ៎1 ▖⺮Ⱞ#⳪ⲏ㩊#✂#⪰➟ឲ៎1 ⟆ხ#⃹#ᖊ⻆#ᡚⱞ㘚ც#㞪ẖᅚᖂ#ᠾ#ⱞ▫#ⵞⲖ㩂⺪#⨴➟ឲ ៎1KO 46 ≪ᵇ ⋚#㟶Ɫᠾ#᧾➎㧶ᳲⱞKO 47 KO 48 㖎⮶ᧆ#△ⱢKO 49 KO 50 ጚ✊#ⴆ⮺ ㍞Ἶᱦ#㖪Ɐ ᳶ⹲#⫚ᆚ ᳶ⹲#⟆➎㙆 # ▖⺮#㫿⟇2ⱞ⃢⺪#☦☆ 㩞▫᢮ # ᡚⱞ㘚#㫿⟇ ᡚⱞ㘚#㕖ጚ Ⅾ㡦#Ἶᾒẖ ⳪ⲏ#Ỏ㆞ ᙢ㊆#㌋⳿ ㌋⳿#⮺㍃2㌋⳿#ℓⅿ ㌋⳿#ⅾ⯮ ჺ᢮#ⅾ⯮ ᙢ㊆#ᾒᧆ# #KO 51 㧶ᲂ⟆#ᙢ㊆#㏒㞢ᵎ 㧶ᲂ⟆#ⲏ㍂#⫚ᆚ# ᣃጚ㬾 㧶ᲂ⟆#ᣃጚ㬾#⟆ხ 㧶ᲂ⟆#ᙢ㊆#㌋⳿ 㧶ᲂ⟆#ᙢ㊆#⇞⳿ 㧶ᲂ⟆#ᾒᧆ#㥆⟆ ⋚#㟶Ɫᠾ ጚ⇢#⋚#㟶Ɫᠾ ⳻⨲ᆧ ⱞ⃢⺪#⫫⫗#ⴆ㩆 ⟆ㄒ#ⵚ⳿ጚ ⋚#㟶Ɫᠾⱂ#ⱞ⃢⺪⬪#⟎ⴆ#ⱞ⃢⺪ⱂ#ⱦ㍂ 㬿៪ ጚ⇢#ᅚẖ#㌋⳿ᆮ# 㮒ᇦⳫⱢ#㌋⳿#ጚⷪ ᧾➎㧶ᳲⱞKO 52 ☾㘚#⃹#☾㘚ẫ ☾㘚 ☾㘚#ᄆℓ#⟆ხ # # ☾㘚ⱂ#㬿ⲏ ẞẖ⹲ ㍞Ἶᱦ#㐆ጚ2ᔮጚ# ⳮ⮺#ᇟዳ ㊓ⳮጚKO 53 ㍞Ἶᱦ#㩂⮚⺿ ♶Ⲗ ▦ძ៪#㬪#ᖂ▖▚ ⱻᣃ#⬒᢮ Ɫ㘚㢂ⱞ➎ ዆ᆓ „ᅶ ⴆ㥲#ᖞ⫗KO 54 OHLFD#ᇊᄇ#☆⌮➎#☦㘚 OHLFD#ᇊᄇ#☆⌮➎#☦㘚Leica M-D InstructionsEN 56 Foreword FOREWORD Dear Customer, Leica would like to thank you for purchasing the Leica M-D and to congratulate you on your choice. With this unique digital view and range finder camera, you have made an excellent choice. We wish you a great deal of pleasure and success using your new camera. In order to make best use of all the opportunities offered by this high performance camera, we recommend that you first read this instruction manual.EN 57 This is a Class B product based on the standard of the Voluntary Control Council for Interference from Information Technology Equipment (VCCI). If this is used near a radio or television receiver in a domestic environment, it may cause radio interference. Install and use the equipment according to the instruction manual. FCC Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide reasonable protection against harmful interfer ence in a residential installation. This equip- ment generates, uses, and can radiate radio frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instructions, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. However, there is no guar antee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, the user is encouraged to try to correct the interference by one or more of the following measures: • Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna. • Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver. • Connect the equipment into an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the receiver is connected. • Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help. FCC Caution: To assure continued compliance, follow the attached installation instructions and use only shielded inter face cables with ferrite core when connecting to com put er or peripheral devices. Any changes or modifications not expressly approved by the party responsible for compliance could void the user’s authority to operate this equipment. Trade Name: LEICA Model No.: LEICA M-D (Typ 262) Responsible party/ Support contact: Leica Camera Inc. 1 Pearl Count, Unit A Allendale, New Jersey 07401 Tel.: +1 201 995 0051 Fax: +1 201 995 1684 technicalinfo@leicacamerausa.com This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause unde- sired operation. LEICA M-D (Typ 262) Tested To Comply With FCC Standards FOR HOME OR OFFICE USE For Canada only: CAN ICES-3 (B)/NMB-3(B)EN 58 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS Foreword ...................................................................................56 Warning messages .....................................................................60 Legal information .......................................................................60 Disposal of electrical and electronic equipment ..........................61 Designation of parts ...................................................................62 Quick-start guide .......................................................................64 Detailed instructions ..................................................................64 Preparations Attaching the carrying strap ....................................................64 Charging the battery ................................................................65 Changing the battery and memory card ...................................68 Leica M lenses .......................................................................71 Attaching .............................................................................73 Removing ............................................................................73 Operating elements Main switch .............................................................................74 Shutter button ........................................................................74 Time setting dial .....................................................................75 Basic settings Date and time .........................................................................76 ISO sensitivity .........................................................................77 Permanent camera settings ....................................................77 Bright line view and range finder ................................................78 The image field selector ...........................................................79 Distance metering .....................................................................80 Exposure metering .....................................................................82 Turning the exposure meter on/off .........................................82 Exposure modes .....................................................................83 Aperture priority ...................................................................83 Exposure lock ....................................................................84 Exposure compensation .....................................................84 Manual exposure setting ......................................................84 The B setting .......................................................................85 Values above and below the metering range ...........................85 Flash operation .........................................................................86EN 59 Table of Contents Miscellaneous Taking photographs with the self-timer.....................................90 Playback .................................................................................90 Transferring data to a computer ...............................................90 Using raw data DNG ...............................................................90 Installing firmware updates ......................................................91 System accessories ..................................................................92 Spare parts ................................................................................93 Precautions and care instructions General precautions ................................................................94 Care instructions .....................................................................95 Cleaning the sensor .................................................................97 Storage ...................................................................................98 Malfunctions and their resolution ...............................................99 Appendix Viewfinder displays ................................................................100 Index .......................................................................................102 Technical data .........................................................................104 Leica service addresses ...........................................................108EN 60 Warnings/Legal notices The CE identification of our products documents compliance with the fundamental requirements of the applicable EU directives. WARNING MESSAGES • Modern electronic elements react sensitively to electrostatic discharge. As you can easily pick up charges of tens of thou- sands of volts, by walking on synthetic carpets for example, a discharge can occur when you touch your camera, particularly if it is placed on a conductive surface. If only the camera housing is touched, this discharge is harmless to the electronics. How- ever, despite built-in safety circuits, the outer contacts, such as the accessory shoe, battery or rear panel contacts, should not be touched if at all possible for safety reasons. If the accessory shoe is not in use, the relevant cover (supplied) should always be in place. • For any cleaning of the contacts, do not use an optical micro- fiber cloth (synthetic); use a cotton or linen cloth instead! Before touching the contacts, you can make sure you discharge any electrostatic charge by deliberately touching a heating or water pipe (conductive, earthed material). You can also avoid soiling and oxidization of the contacts by storing your camera in a dry place with the lens or bayonet cover fitted. • Use only the recommended accessories to prevent faults, short circuits or electric shock. • Do not attempt to remove parts of the housing (covers); repairs must be done at authorized service centers only. LEGAL INFORMATION • Please ensure that you strictly observe copyright laws. The recording and publication of pre-recorded media such as tapes, CDs, or other published or broadcast material may contravene copyright laws. • This also applies to all of the software supplied. • The SD, HDMI, and USB logos are registered trademarks. • Other names, company and product names referred to in this manual are trademarks or registered trademarks of the respec- tive companies.EN 61 Disposal of electrical and electronic equipment DISPOSAL OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT (Applies within the EU, and for other European countries with segregated waste collection systems) This device contains electrical and/or electronic components and must therefore not be disposed of in general household waste! Instead, it should be disposed of at a recycling collection point provided by the local authority. This costs you nothing. If the device contains standard or rechargeable batteries, these must be removed first and also be disposed of in line with relevant regula- tions. Further information on the subject is available from your local administration, your local waste collection company, or in the store where you purchased this device. The production date of your camera can be found on the stickers in the warranty card and/or on the packaging and that of the rechargeable batteries on their housing. In the case of the camera, this is written year/month/day and in the case of the rechargeable batteries calendar week/year (WW/YY).EN 62 Designation of parts DESIGNATION OF PARTS Figures in the front and rear cover pages Front view 1 Lens release button 2 Eyes for carrying strap 3 Range finder viewing window 4 Brightness sensor 1 5 Self-timer LED 6 Viewfinder viewing window 7 Image field selector 8 Bottom cover locking point 1 Leica M lenses with viewfinder attachment cover the brightness sensor. Information about functions with these and other lenses can be found under "Displays in the viewfinder", p. 100, and „Leica M lenses ", p. 71. Top view 9 Fixed ring with a. Index for distance setting b. Depth of field scale c. Red index button for changing lenses 10 Aperture setting dial 11 Index point for aperture setting 12 Lens hood 13 Focusing ring with a. recessed grip 14 Shutter release button 15 Function button 16 Main switch with detent position for – OFF (camera turned off) – S (single pictures) – C (serial exposures) – (self-timer, time/date setting, or sensor cleaning) 17 Time-setting dial with detent positions for – A for automatic shutter speed control – Shutter speeds 1 ⁄4000 - 8s (incl. intermediate values) – B (Long-time exposure) – Flash sync speed ( 1 ⁄⁄180s) 18 Accessory shoeEN 63 Designation of parts Rear view 19 Viewfinder 20 Thumb wheel 21 ISO setting with a. Scale b. Setting disc c. Index point 22 LED for indicating picture mode/recording data Bottom view (with bottom cover fitted) 23 Locking toggle for bottom cover 24 Tripod thread A ¼, DIN 4503 (¼“) 25 Bottom cover (with bottom cover removed) 26 Memory card slot 27 Battery compartment 28 Battery locking sliderEN 64 Quick-Start Guide QUICK-START GUIDE YOU WILL NEED THE FOLLOWING ITEMS: – Camera – Battery – Memory card (not supplied) – Charger and mains cable PREPARATIONS 1. Charge the battery (see p. 65) 2. Insert the battery (see p. 68) 3. Insert the memory card (see p. 69) 4. Turn on the camera (see p. 74) 5. Set the date and time (see p. 76) TAKING PHOTOGRAPHS 6. Attach the lens (see p. 73) 7. Set the shutter speed setting dial to A (see p. 75) 8. Set the subject focus (see p. 80) 9. Turn on the camera (see p. 74) 10. Turn on exposure metering (see p. 82) 11. Correct the exposure, if necessary (see p. 84) 12. Release the shutter (see p. 54) DETAILED INSTRUCTIONS PREPARATION ATTACHING THE CARRYING STRAP EN 65 Preparations CHARGING THE BATTERY The camera is powered by a lithium ion battery. • The green LED marked CHARGE starts fl ashing to confi rm that charging is in progress. As soon as the battery has charged to at least 4 ⁄5 of its capacity, the yellow LED marked 80% also lights up. When the battery is fully charged, the green LED also changes from fl ashing to continuously lit. Note: The 80% LED lights up after around 2 hours due to the charging characteristics. The charger should be disconnected from the mains when charging is complete. There is therefore no risk of overcharging.EN 66 Preparations Caution: • Only the battery type specified and described in this manual (Order No. 14 499), or battery types specified and described by Leica Camera AG, may be used in this camera. • These batteries may only be used in the units for which they are designed and may only be charged exactly as described below. • Using this battery contrary to the instructions and using non- specified battery types can result in an explosion under certain circumstances! • The batteries must not be exposed to heat or sunlight for pro- longed periods, or to humidity or moisture. Likewise, the batter- ies must not be placed in a microwave oven or a high pressure container as this results in a risk of fire or explosion! • A safety valve in the battery guarantees that any excess pres- sure caused by improper handling is discharged safely. • Only the charger specified and described in this manual (order no. 14 494) is to be used. The use of other chargers not approved by Leica Camera AG can cause damage to the batter- ies and, in extreme cases, can cause serious or life-threatening injuries. • The charger supplied should be used exclusively for charging this battery type. Do not attempt to use it for other purposes. • The car charging cable supplied must never be connected while the charger is connected to the mains. • Ensure that the mains outlet used for charging is freely accessi- ble. • The battery and charger must not be opened. Repairs may only be carried out by authorized service centers.EN 67 Preparations Notes: • The battery should be charged before the camera is used for the first time. • The battery must have a temperature of 10°-30°C to be charged (otherwise the charger will not turn on, or will turn off again). • Lithium ion batteries can be charged at any time, regardless of their current charge level. If a battery is only partly discharged when charging starts, it is charged to full capacity faster. • The batteries warm up during the charging process. This is normal and not a malfunction. • If the two LEDs on the charger flash rapidly (> 2Hz) after starting
charging, this indicates a charging error (e.g. maximum charging
time exceeded, voltages or temperatures outside the permitted
ranges, or short circuit). In this case, disconnect the charger
from the mains and remove the battery. Ensure that the above
temperature conditions are met and then restart the charging
process. If the problem persists, please contact your dealer, the
Leica office in your country or Leica Camera AG.
• A new battery only reaches its full capacity after it has been fully
charged and – by use in the camera – discharged again 2 or 3
times. This discharge procedure should be repeated every 25
cycles. To ensure a maximum service life of the battery, it should
not be exposed to constant extremes of temperature (e.g. in a
parked car in the summer or winter).
• Even when used under optimum conditions, every battery has a
limited service life! After several hundred charging cycles, this
becomes noticeable as the operating times become significantly
shorter.
• The battery should be replaced after a maximum of four years,
as its performance deteriorates and reliable operation can no
longer be guaranteed, particularly in cold conditions.
• Defective batteries should be disposed of according to the
respective instructions (see p. 61).
• The replaceable battery provides power to a back-up battery
which is permanently fitted in the camera. This back-up battery
retains the set date and time for up to 2 months. If this back-up
battery becomes discharged it must be recharged by inserting
the replaceable main battery. Once the replaceable battery has
been inserted, the full capacity of the back-up battery is recov-
ered after about a few days. This process does not require the
camera to be turned on.EN
68
Preparations
CHANGING THE BATTERY/MEMORY CARD
Turn the camera off (see p. 74).
Important:
Do not open the bottom cover or remove the memory card or
battery while the red LED on the back of the camera is fl ashing,
indicating picture recording and/or data saving to the card. Other-
wise the unsaved (or not completely saved) picture data may be
lost.
Removing the bottom cover
1
3
2
4
Inserting the battery
Removing the battery
2
1EN
69
Preparations
Charge level display
You can display the current battery capacity in the viewfi nder:
1. Turn on the camera
Only necessary if the viewfi nder display has switched itself off
again even though the camera is switched on:
2. Press the shutter release button to the fi rst pressure point
3. Press the function button 2x.
• When pressed repeatedly, the battery and memory card
capacities are alternately displayed as percentages. To
diff erentiate, when the battery capacity is displayed, a dot
also lights up at the top of the display for the battery capac-
ity.
Notes:
• The capacity display appears irrespective of whether the view-
fi nder display was on before or not.
• Remove the battery if you will not be using the camera for a long
period of time.
• A maximum of 2 months after the capacity of a battery left in
the camera is exhausted (see also the last note under “Charging
the battery”, p. 65), the date and time need to be re-entered.
Inserting the memory card
Removing the memory cardEN
70
Preparations
Compatible memory cards
The camera saves the pictures on an SD (secure digital), SDHC
(high capacity), or SDXC (eXtended capacity) card.
SD/SDHC/SDXC memory cards are available from various suppli-
ers and with different capacities and read/write speeds. Particu-
larly those with high capacities and read/write speeds allow data
to be recorded and retrieved very quickly. The cards have a write
protection switch, which can be used to prevent unintentional
storage and deletion of pictures. This switch takes the form of a
slider on the non-beveled side of the card; in the lower position,
marked LOCK, the data on the card is protected.
Note:
Do not touch the memory card contacts.
Displaying the memory card capacity
You can display the number photographs that can still be taken in
the viewfinder:
1. Turn on the camera
• The battery capacity is displayed first.
2. Press the function button 1x
Only necessary if the viewfinder display has switched itself off
again even though the camera is switched on:
3. Press the shutter release button to the first pressure point
4. Press the function button 1x
• The relevant value is displayed.
3s after the shutter release button has been pressed to the
first pressure point, or after the function button has been let
go, the display returns to the normal state.
When the card`s capacity limit has been reached, Full always
appears, irrespective of whether the viewfinder display was
switched on before or not.
Notes:
• The range of SD/SDHC/SDXC cards is too large for Leica
Camera AG to be able to completely test all available types for
compatibility and quality. Although using other card types is not
likely to damage the camera or the card, some “no name” cards
do not comply with the SD/SDHC/SDXC standards and Leica
Camera AG is unable to provide any guarantee that they will
function correctly.
• If the memory card cannot be inserted, check that it is aligned
correctly.
• As electromagnetic fields, electrostatic charges, and defects on the
camera or the card can lead to damage or loss of the data on the
memory card, we recommend that you also transfer the data to a
computer and save it there (see p. 90).
• For the same reason, it is recommended that the card is always
stored in its antistatic cover.EN
71
Preparations
LEICA M LENSES
Generally, most Leica M lenses can be used. Details on the small
number of exceptions and restrictions can be found in the following
notes.
They can be used regardless of the lens features, and whether it
does or does not have 6-bit coding in the bayonet. In the case of
lenses with coding, the camera uses the information transmitted to
optimize exposure and image data.
Even without this additional feature, i.e. when using Leica M lenses
without identifi cation, the camera will deliver excellent pictures in
most situations.
Important:
• The following cannot be used:
– Hologon 1:8/15mm,
– Summicron 1:2/50mm with close-up,
– Elmar 1:4/90mm with retractable tube (manufactured from
1954-1968)
– Some versions of the Summilux-M 1.4/35mm (not aspherical,
manufactured from 1961-1995, Made in Canada) cannot be
fi tted to the camera or will not focus to infi nity. The Leica
Customer Care department can modify these lenses so that
they can be used on the camera.
• The following can be used, but risk damaging the camera or
lens:
Lenses with retractable tube can only be used with the tube
extended, i.e. their tube must never be retracted into the cam-
era. This is not the case with the current Macro-Elmar-M
1:4/90mm, as its tube does not protrude into the camera body
even when retracted. It can therefore be used without any
restrictions.EN
72
Preparations
The following can be used with restrictions
Despite the high precision of the range finder on the camera, exact
focusing with 135mm lenses with an open aperture cannot be
guaranteed due to the very low depth of field. Therefore, stopping
down by at least 2 stops is recommended.
• Possible, but excluded from the exposure metering
– Super-Angulon-M 1:4/21mm
– Super-Angulon-M 1:3,4/21mm
– Elmarit-M 1:2,8/28mm with serial nos. before 2 314 921.
Notes:
• The Leica Customer Care department can retrofit many Leica M
lenses with 6-bit coding. (Address, see p. 108).
• When using the Leica Tri-Elmar-M 1:4/16-18-21mm ASPH., the
set focal length is not transferred to the camera and thus is not
included in the EXIF data for pictures.
• By contrast, the Leica Tri-Elmar-M 1:4/28-35-50mm ASPH
features mechanical transfer of the set focal length to the cam-
era, necessary to display the appropriate bright line frame in the
viewfinder, which is scanned by the camera`s electronics and
used for focal-length-specific compensation. This applies to all
three versions of the lens (item nos. 11 625, 11 890 and 11
894).EN
73
Preparations
Attaching the lens
1. Turn off the camera
2. Hold the lens at the fi xed ring
3. Align the red index button on the lens with the release button
on the camera housing.
4. In this position, insert the lens straight
5. Turn the lens slightly to the right, and you will hear and feel it
click into place.
Detaching the lens
1. Turn off the camera
2. Hold the lens at the fi xed ring.
3. Press down the release button on the camera housing
4. Turn the lens to the left until its red index button is aligned with
the release button.
5. Remove the lens
Notes:
• Generally, to protect against ingress of dust etc. into the interior
of the camera, it is important always to have a lens or a cover
fi tted to the camera body.
• For the same reason, when changing lenses work quickly and in
an environment that is as dust-free as possible.
• Camera or lens rear covers should not be stored in your pants
pocket as they attract dust that can get into the camera when
they are fi tted. EN
74
Camera operation
OPERATING ELEMENTS
MAIN SWITCH
16 17
The camera is turned ON and OFF using the main switch. This is
below the shutter release button and is a lever with four detent
positions:
OFF – Camera turned off
b. S – Single picture
Pressing the shutter release takes a single picture regardless of
how long it is held down for. Activation of the shutter release
button is extremely quiet and causes minimum vibration.
c. C – Continuous series
A series of pictures are taken for as long as the shutter release
is held down and the capacity of the memory card used and the
internal buff er memory is suffi cient. At least 8 pictures are taken
in rapid succession, subsequent pictures with a reduced fre-
quency.
d. – Self-timer
Pressing the shutter release starts the set delay time (see p. 90),
then the picture is taken.
Notes:
• After turning on, the camera is ready to use after approx. 1s.
• If the camera is out of use for an extended period or is stored in
a case, always turn it off at the main switch. This prevents any
power consumption, including that which continues to occur in
standby mode after the exposure meter is turned off automati-
cally and the display is extinguished. This also prevents pictures
from being taken accidentally.
SHUTTER RELEASE BUTTON
The shutter release button has two pressure points:
1. Pressing down to the 1st pressure point
– activates exposure metering and the viewfi nder display
– saves the metered exposure value in aperture priority mode,
i.e. the shutter speed determined by the camera (for more
details, refer to the “Metering memory lock” section on p. 84)
* Depending on card speedEN
75
Camera operation
If the shutter release button is pressed down to this pressure
stage, the display stays on. If the camera had previously been in
stand-by mode, it will be reactivated and the displays switched on.
If you release the shutter button, the metering system and the
displays remain activated for around a further 30s (for more
details, refer to the sections on p. 82).
Notes:
The shutter button remains blocked if
– the internal buff er memory is (temporarily) full, e.g. after a series
of ≥16 pictures, or
– the memory card inserted and the internal buff er memory are
(temporarily) full, or
– the memory card inserted is write-protected, or
– the picture numbering of the memory card inserted is used up
(in such a case, format the card outside the camera after saving
the data), or
– the battery has exceeded its performance limits (capacity,
temperature, age)
– the bottom cover is not in place.
2. Pressing the shutter button all the way down takes a picture. The
data is then transferred to the memory card.
Note:
To avoid wobble, the shutter button should be pressed gently, not
jerkily, until the shutter is released with a soft click.
TIME THUMBWHEEL
The exposure modes are selected using the shutter speed thumb-
wheel,
– Aperture priority mode by setting the A position (see p. 83),
– Manual mode by selecting a shutter speed of
1
⁄4000s to 8s, (inter-
mediate values in ½ step positions are also available), and
– the shortest possible sync speed of
1
⁄180s for fl ash mode,
marked with the symbol (s. S. 89), and
– B for long exposures (see p. 85).
The Leica M shutter speed dial has no stop, i.e. it can be turned in
either direction from any position. It detents at all marked positions
and at the intermediate values. Values between the detent posi-
tions cannot be used.
More details on setting the correct exposure can be found in the
sections under the heading: “Exposure metering” from page 82.EN
76
Camera operation
BASIC SETTINGS
DATE AND TIME
Actual setting is done only with the function button, the thumb-
wheel and the viewfi nder display.
Accessing the setting mode:
1. Set main switch to
2. Press the function button for a long time (≥12s, during this
time, no other operation process may be carried out)
Setting each of the values:
3. With thumbwheel
Switching between the value groups:
4. Briefl y press the function button
Order of the value groups
Adjusting the year:
Adjusting the month:
Adjusting the day:
Adjusting the hour:
Adjusting the minute:
Leaving the setting mode
1. Press the function button for a long time(≥12s), or turn the
main switch from the position, or briefl y touch the shutter
release button
All settings are accepted/saved.EN
77
Camera operation
ISO SENSITIVITY
The ISO setting covers a range of ISO 200 – 6400 in
1
⁄3 ISO incre-
ments, and thus enables you to adapt the shutter speed/aperture
values to the relevant situation as required. The setting disc with
detent positions on the back of the camera is used for this. Turn it
so that the index point is opposite the desired value on the scale.
Note:
Particularly at high ISO values and when editing pictures, noise as
well as vertical and horizontal stripes may become visible, espe-
cially in large, uniformly bright areas of the subject.
PERMANENT CAMERA SETTINGS
This camera saves the picture data in compressed loss-free DNG
format. White balance is automatic.EN
78
Camera operation
BRIGHT-LINE VIEW AND RANGE FINDER
The camera’s bright-line view and range fi nder is not only a very
high-quality, large, brilliant and bright viewfi nder, it is also a highly
accurate range fi nder coupled to the lens. It has a magnifi cation
factor of 0.68x. The bright-line frames are lit in white by LEDs.
The bright-line frames are linked to the range setting to ensure that
the parallax – the off set between the lens and the viewfi nder axis –
is automatically compensated. At a range of below 2m the sensor
detects slightly less than shown by the inner edges of the bright-
line frame, and slightly more at longer ranges (see adjacent dia-
gram). These slight variations, which are hardly ever critical in prac-
tice, are due to the operating principle.
Bright-line frames on a viewfi nder camera must be matched to the
image angle of the relevant lens focal lengths. However, the nomi-
nal image angles change slightly when focusing due to the chang-
ing extension, i.e. the distance between the optical system and the
sensor plane. If the set range is less than infi nity (and the exten-
sion correspondingly greater), the actual image angle is smaller –
the lens captures less of the subject. In addition, the diff erences in
the image angle tend to be greater at longer focal lengths, as a
result of the greater extension.
In the middle of the viewfi nder image is the square range metering
image, which is brighter than the surrounding image fi eld.
If the exposure meter is turned on, the exposure meter LEDs and
the fl ash symbol LED appear at the lower edge of the viewfi nder
image. For more details about setting the range and exposure
metering, as well as fl ash mode, refer to the relevant sections on p.
80/82/86.
22:45 PM 22.02.2012
999-9000
8234/9999 12MP
2.8 F 1/8000 12500 ISO EV
INFO
A
B
All pictures and bright-line frame positions relative to 50mm focal length
A Bright-line frame
B Actual image fi eld
Set to 0.7m: The sensor detects approx. one frame width less.
Set to 2m: The sensor detects exactly the image fi eld shown by the inner
edges of the bright-line frame.
Set to infi nity: The sensor detects approx. 1 or 4 (vertical or horizontal)
frame width(s) more.EN
79
Camera operation
IMAGE FIELD SELECTOR
The image fi eld selector extends the possibilities of this built-in
universal viewfi nder: at any time, you can view frames that do not
belong to the current lens. You can then see immediately if, for
image composition reasons, it would be better to photograph the
relevant subject using a diff erent focal length.
If the lever is rotated outwards, i.e. away from the lens, the image
fi eld limits for 35 and 135mm focal length are shown.
If the lever is rotated to the vertical, centered position, the image
fi eld limits for 50 and 75mm focal length are shown. If the lever is
rotated inward, i.e. toward the lens, the image fi eld limits for 28
and 90mm focal length are shown.
35mm + 135mm
22:45 PM 22.02.2012
999-9000
8234/9999 12MP
2.8 F 1/8000 12500 ISO EV
INFO
50mm + 75mm
22:45 PM 22.02.2012
999-9000
8234/9999 12MP
2.8 F 1/8000 12500 ISO EV
INFO
28mm + 90mm
22:45 PM 22.02.2012
999-9000
8234/9999 12MP
2.8 F 1/8000 12500 ISO EV
INFOEN
80
Picture mode
RANGE MEASUREMENT
Due to its large effective metering basis, the range finder on this
camera is very precise. The benefits of this are particularly notice-
able when using wide-angle lenses with their relatively high depth
of field.
Mechanical metering basis
(Distance between the optical
axes of the viewfinder window
and the range finder viewing
window)
x Viewfinder
zoom
= Effective
metering
basis
69.25mm x 0.68 = approx.
47.1mm
The range finder metering field is visible as a bright, sharply defined
rectangle in the center of the viewfinder. The focus can be set
using either the superimposed image or split image method:
Superimposed image method
In a portrait, for example, aim the metering field at the eye and turn
the distance setting ring on the lens until the contours in the
metering field are brought into line. Then choose the subject detail.
Out of focus In focusEN
81
Picture mode
Split image method
When taking photographs of architecture, for example, aim the
range finder metering field at the vertical edge or another clearly
defined vertical line and turn the distance setting ring on the lens
until the contours of the edge or line can be seen at the limits of
the metering field with no misalignment. Then choose the subject
detail.
Out of focus In focus
EN
82
Picture mode
EXPOSURE METERING
In this camera, the exposure is metered for the available ambient
light though the lens with the working aperture with strong center
weighting. The light reflected by a bright shutter diaphragm blade
in the first shutter curtain is measured. The time/aperture combi-
nations suitable for the correct exposure are indicated by the
viewfinder displays or identified with their help.
In aperture priority mode, the aperture is selected manually, how-
ever the camera forms the shutter speed automatically. In this
mode a digital LED display provides information on the shutter
speed to be used (e.g. 1000)
A light balance (▸▯◂) comprising three red LEDs is used to adjust
the exposure for manual settings. If the setting is right, only the
central, circular LED lights up.
Turning the exposure meter on/off
The exposure meter is switched on by lightly pressing the shutter
release button down to its 1st pressure point, provided that the
camera is switched on with the main switch and the shutter speed
dial is not set to B. The readiness of the exposure meter is signaled
by the constant lighting of one of the displays in the viewfinder:
– in aperture priority mode the digital LED display of the shutter
speed,
– and in manual mode one of the two triangular LEDs lights up,
either individually or in conjunction with the center circular LED.
If you let go of the shutter release button without activating the
shutter, the exposure meter remains turned on for around 12s
more, and the relevant LED(s) remain lit for the same time. If the
shutter speed setting dial is set to B, the exposure meter is dis-
abled.
Notes:
• When the displays have gone out, the camera is in a “stand-by”
mode.
• In very low ambient light, i.e. at the limits of the exposure meter,
it can take around 0.2s until the LEDs light up.
• In aperture priority mode, if correct exposure cannot be
achieved using the available shutter speeds, the shutter speed
display gives a warning by flashing (for more details, refer to the
“Aperture priority mode” section on p. 83).
• If the exposure meter reading is below its working range in very
low lighting conditions and in manual mode, the left hand trian-
gular LED flashes as a warning. In aperture priority mode, the
shutter speed is still displayed. If the required shutter speed falls
below the slowest possible setting of 60s, this display also
flashes.
• If the camera is out of use for an extended period or is stored in
a case, always turn it off at the main switch. This prevents any
power consumption, including that which continues to occur in
standby mode after the exposure meter is turned off automati-
cally and the display is extinguished. This also prevents pictures
from being taken accidentally.
The appropriate shutter speed for correct exposure, or the varia-
tion from a correct exposure setting, are specified or determined
using displays in the viewfinder (see following sections).EN
83
Picture mode
EXPOSURE MODES
The camera provides two exposure modes: Aperture priority mode
and manual mode. Depending on the subject, situation and your
individual preferences, you can thus choose between
– the familiar “semi automatic” operation, or
– setting a fixed shutter speed and aperture.
APERTURE PRIORITY
If the shutter speed thumbwheel is in theA position, the electronics
within the camera generates the exposure time automatically and
continuously in the range of
1
/4000s to 60s, in accordance with the
film speed setting, the metered brightness and the manually selected
aperture. The calculated shutter speed is displayed in half steps to
provide a better overview.
For shutter speeds slower than 2s the remaining exposure time is
counted down and displayed in seconds after the shutter release.
The actually generated and continuously controlled exposure time
can however vary from the half step value displayed: For example, if
the display shows 16 (the closest value) before releasing the shutter,
but the calculated exposure time is longer, the countdown after
releasing the shutter may actually start from 19.
Under extreme lighting conditions, based on all the parameters the
exposure meter may generate a shutter that is outside the working
range, i.e. brightness values that would require shorter exposures
than
1
⁄4000s or longer than 60s. In such cases the specified minimum
or maximum shutter speed is nevertheless used, and these values
flash in the viewfinder as a warning.
Notes:
• As described in connection with the ISO setting on p. 77, a
certain amount of noise becomes apparent when using higher
sensitivities, and particularly with uniform dark surfaces. To
reduce this annoying phenomenon, after pictures with slow
shutter speeds and high ISO values the camera automatically
takes a second “black picture” (taken with the shutter closed).
The noise present in this parallel picture is then digitally “sub-
tracted” from the data for the real picture. This doubling of the
“exposure” time can be significant at longer exposure times, and
must be allowed for. During this time the camera should not be
turned off.
• If you want a darker or brighter reproduction of the subject, it is
recommended to set the exposure manually (see p. 84). EN
84
Picture mode
EXPOSURE LOCK
For compositional reasons, the most important part of the subject
is often not in the center of the picture, and as a result such impor-
tant parts of the subject may be excessively light or dark. Center-
weighted metering, however, records only an area in the center of
the image and is calibrated to an average gray scale value.
Subjects and situations of this type can be overcome very easily
even in aperture priority mode, using exposure lock.
Using the function
1. Aim at the important subject detail or alternatively at another
detail with average brightness.
2. Press the shutter release button down to the 1st pressure
point for measurement and saving. As long as the pressure
point is held, a small red dot appears in the viewfinder at the
top in the digits line for confirmation, and the exposure time no
longer changes even if the lighting conditions are different.
3. Keeping the shutter release pressed, move the camera to
capture the final trimming,
4. The shutter can then be released using the exposure originally
determined.
Changing the aperture setting after using exposure lock has no
effect on the shutter speed, and will lead to an incorrect exposure.
Exposure lock is canceled when you remove your finger from the
shutter release pressure point.
EXPOSURE COMPENSATION
Exposure meters are calibrated to a gray scale value, which corre-
sponds to the brightness of a normal, i.e. average photographic
subject. If the actual subject detail does not match this assump-
tion, an appropriate exposure compensation can be performed.
Particularly when taking several pictures in succession, for
instance if for any reason a series of pictures is taken deliberately
using slight under or overexposure, exposure compensation is a
very useful function: In contrast to exposure lock, once set it
remains effective until it is reset. Exposure compensation can be
set in the range ±3EV in
1

3
EV steps (EV: Exposure Value).
1. Turn on the camera
2. Keep the function button pressed down and turn the thumbwheel
• During setting, the digital display in the viewfinder shows the
relevant value. Even after the shutter release button has
been lightly pressed, it appears for a short time.
MANUAL EXPOSURE SETTING
If the exposure setting is performed entirely manually, the shutter
speed dial must be clicked to one of the engraved exposure times
or to one of the intermediate values.
Then:
1. Turn on the exposure meter, and
2. turn the shutter speed dial and /or the aperture setting ring on
the lens – in each case in the direction indicated by the trian-
gular LED that is lit up – until only the circular LED is lit up.EN
85
Picture mode
As well as the direction of rotation of the shutter speed thumb-
wheel and aperture setting ring necessary for correct exposure,
the three LEDs in the light balance also indicate underexposure,
overexposure and correct exposure in the following way:
Underexposure by at least one aperture stop; turning to the
right is required
Underexposure by at most half an aperture stop; turning to
the right is required
Correct exposure
Overexposure by at most half an aperture stop; turning to
the left is required
Overexposure by at least one aperture stop; turning to the
left is required
Note:
For shutter speeds slower than 2s the remaining exposure time is
counted down and displayed in seconds after the shutter release.
THE B SETTING
With the B setting, the shutter remains open for as long as the
shutter release button is held down (up to a maximum of 60s;
depending on the ISO setting).
The exposure meter is disabled; however the digital display in the
viewfinder counts the elapsed exposure time in seconds, for guid-
ance.
Notes:
• Long exposure times can be associated with very heavy picture
noise.
• To reduce this annoying phenomenon, following exposures with
slower shutter speeds (below approx.
1
⁄30s) this camera automati-
cally takes a second “black picture” (with the shutter closed). The
noise present in this parallel picture is then digitally “subtracted”
from the data for the real picture.
• This doubling of the “exposure” time can be significant at longer
exposure times, and must be allowed for. During this time the
camera should not be turned off.
VALUES ABOVE AND BELOW THE METERING RANGE
If the exposure meter reading is below its working range in very low
lighting conditions and in manual mode, the left hand triangular
LED ( ) flashes as a warning in the viewfinder, while the right hand
LED ( ) does the same if there is too much light. In aperture
priority mode, the shutter speed is still displayed. If the required
shutter speed is more than the slowest possible 60s or less than
the fastest possible of
1
/
4000
s, these displays also flash. As the
exposure is metered with the working aperture, this situation can
come about by stopping down the lens. Even if you are below the
metering range, the exposure meter remains on for around 30s
after you let go of the shutter release button. If the lighting condi-
tions improve in this time (e.g. through a change in the subject
detail or opening of the aperture), the LED display changes from
flashing to continuously lit, indicating that the meter is ready.EN
86
Picture mode
FLASH MODE
The camera determines the necessary flash power by firing one or
more ranging flashes, fractions of a second before taking the
actual picture. Immediately after this, at the start of exposure, the
main flash is fired. All factors that influence the exposure (such as
picture filter and changes to the aperture setting) are automatically
taken into account.
COMPATIBLE FLASH UNITS
The following flash units, when used on the camera, are capable of
all the functions described in this manual, including TTL flash
metering:
• Leica system flash units, such as the models SF 40, SF 64, SF
26, SF 58.
• Flash units that satisfy the technical requirements for a System
3000 System Camera Adaption (SCA), are fitted with the SCA-
3502-M52 adapter.
Other commercially available flash attachments with standard flash
foot and positive center contact, and fired by the center contact (X
contact) can also be used.
ATTACHING THE FLASH UNIT
Before attaching a flash unit to the accessory shoe on the camera,
– the cover that protects the accessory shoe when not in use,
must be detached to the rear, and
– the camera and flash unit must be turned off.
When attaching a flash unit, you should ensure that the foot of the
flash unit is fully inserted into the accessory shoe and the clamping
nut is tightened to prevent it accidentally falling out. This is particu-
larly important for flash units with additional control and signal
contacts, because if the position in the accessory shoe changes
the necessary contacts can be broken, leading to malfunctions.
Note:
If the accessory shoe is not in use, the relevant cover (supplied)
should always be in place.EN
87
Picture mode
FLASH EXPOSURE CONTROL
Fully automatic flash mode, i.e. controlled by the camera, is avail-
able on the camera with the system-compatible flash units listed in
the previous section, and in aperture priority A and manual expo-
sure modes.
In addition, automatic illumination control is operational in both
exposure modes. This means that in order to ensure a balanced
relationship between flash and other lighting at all times, the flash
power is reduced by up to 1
2
⁄3EV as ambient brightness increases.
However, if the ambient brightness plus even the shortest possible
flash sync time of
1
⁄180s would cause overexposure, a non-HSS
compatible flash unit will not be fired in aperture priority mode (for
details on HSS operation, see p. 89). In such cases the shutter
speed is governed by the ambient brightness and is shown in the
viewfinder.
In addition, the camera transfers the set sensitivity to the flash
unit. This allows the flash unit, provided it has received such infor-
mation and the aperture manually set on the lens is also input to
the flash unit, automatically to adjust its range values accordingly.
With system compatible flash units, the sensitivity setting cannot
be influenced from the flash unit as it is transferred from the
camera.

Notes:
• Studio flash systems may have a very long burning time. There-
fore, when using them it may be useful to select a slower shutter
speed than
1
⁄180s.
• The same applies to radio controlled flash triggers for
“unchained flash”, as the radio transmission can cause a delay.
• The following sections describe only those settings and func-
tions that are available when using this camera with system-
compatible flash units.
• More details of flash use, in particular for other flash units not
specially adapted to this camera and for different flash modes,
can be found in the relevant manuals.EN
88
Picture mode
Settings for camera-controlled automatic flash mode
When the flash unit used has been switched on and set to the
appropriate mode for TTL flash exposure control (see flash man-
ual), exposure metering must be carried out on the camera:
1. before taking each flash picture by gently pressing the shutter
release, so that the display in the viewfinder shows the shutter
speed or switches to the light balance. If this stage is missed
out by fully depressing the shutter release in one quick move-
ment, the flash unit will not fire even if required.
2. The shutter speed dial must be set to A, to the flash sync
speed (
1
⁄180s), or to a slower shutter speed (including B). In
aperture priority mode, the camera determines the shutter
speed in line with the ambient light, but limits slow shutter
speeds in line with the 1/focal length rule to reduce blurring.
3. The desired aperture, or the aperture required for the relevant
distance to the subject, must be set.
Note:
If the utomatically controlled or manually set shutter speed is faster
than
1
⁄180s, the flash is not fired unless the flash unit is HSS-compat-
ible (see p. 89).
Flash exposure displays in the viewfinder with system-com-
patible flash units
A flash-shaped LED appears in the viewfinder as confirmation and to
display the various operating conditions. This LED appears together
with the displays for exposure metering for the ambient light level,
described in the relevant sections.

In automatic flash mode
(flash unit set to GNC or TTL)
• does not appear despite the flash unit being switched on and
ready for use:
A faster shutter speed than
1
/
180
s is set manually on the camera
and the connected flash unit is not HSS-compatible. In such
cases the camera will not fire the flash unit even though it is
switched on and ready for use.
• flashes slowly (at 2Hz) before the picture is taken:
The flash unit is not yet ready to use
• is lit up before the picture is taken:
The flash unit is ready for use
• remains continuously lit after taking the picture, and the other
displays go out:
The flash is still ready to use.
• flashes rapidly after taking the picture (at 4Hz), and the other
displays go out:
It is not yet ready to use again.
• goes out after taking the picture, together with the other
displays:
Underexposure, perhaps due to the choice of too small an
aperture stop for the subject. EN
89
Picture mode
When the flash unit is set to camera control (A) or manual
mode (M)
• does not appear despite the flash unit being switched on and
ready for use:
An exposure time shorter than
1
/180s has been set manually on
the camera. In such cases the camera will not fire the flash unit
even though it is switched on and ready for use.
• flashes slowly (at 2Hz) before the picture is taken:
The flash unit is not yet ready for use.
• is lit up before the picture is taken:
The flash unit is ready for use.

LINEAR FLASH MODE (HIGH SPEED SYNCHRONIZATION)
Fully automatic, i.e. camera controlled, linear flash operation is
available with this camera when using correspondingly equipped
Leica system flash units, with all shutter speeds and in aperture
priority and manual exposure modes. The camera activates it
automatically if the selected or calculated shutter speed is faster
than the sync speed of
1
⁄180s. If the flash unit is set correctly, this
change does not require the photographer to do anything else.
Important:
The range for HSS flash is significantly lower than for TTL flash.
Notes:
• Manual exposure control also allows any shutter speed up to the
sync speed of
1
/180s to be set.
• If shutter speeds faster than
1
⁄180s are used, the flash unit auto-
matically switched to HSS mode.EN
90
Miscellaneous
MISCELLANEOUS
TAKING PHOTOGRAPHS WITH THE SELF-TIMER
You can use the self-timer to take a picture with a delay of 12s. In
such cases we recommend that the camera is placed on a tripod.
Setting and using the function
1. Turn the main switch to .
2. To start the delay time, press the shutter release button to the
2nd pressure point (see p. 74)
• The LED 7 on the front of the camera flashes for the first
10s to show the progress of the delay time.
During the delay time, it can be restarted by touching the shutter
release button again or the function can be canceled by turning the
main switch out of the position.
Important:
In self-timer mode, the exposure is not set by pressing the shutter
release button to the pressure point, it is set immediately before
the picture is taken.
REVIEW
Your photos are played back on your computer. You need one with
an integrated or connected card reader.
TRANSFERRING DATA TO A COMPUTER
You will need a card reader to transfer image data from a memory
card to a computer. This can be either an integrated card reader or
an externally connected device via USB cable.
Data structure on the memory card
The 100LEICA, 101LEICA, etc. folders can each hold up to 9999
pictures.
USING RAW DATA DNG
For further image processing, you need software compatible with
the DNG (Digital Negative) format used to convert the saved raw
data to the highest quality, for example the raw data converter
Adobe
®
Photoshop
®
Lightroom
®
. It provides quality-optimized
algorithms for digital color processing, delivering exceptionally low
noise photographs with incredible resolution.
During editing, you have the option of subsequently adjusting param-
eters such as white balance, noise reduction, gradation, sharpness
etc. to achieve an optimum image quality.EN
91
Miscellaneous
INSTALLING FIRMWARE UPDATES
Leica is constantly working on developing and optimizing its prod-
ucts. As many functions of the camera are entirely controlled by
software, some of these improvements and extended func-
tions can be installed at a later date.
Leica provides firmware updates at irregular intervals for this
purpose. Information about any resulting changes or additions to
the details in this manual can be found on our website.
www.leica-camera.com
Procedure:
1. Turn off the camera
2. Insert the memory card in an integrated card reader, or one
connected to your computer
3. Formatting the memory card
4. Download the firmware file from our website under the link
“FIRMWARE”
5. Save the *.FW file to the highest level of the card folder struc-
ture.
6. Decompress the *.FW file if necessary
7. Remove the memory card from the card reader
8. Make sure that the camera is switched off, insert the memory
card in the camera and close the bottom cover
9. Keep the function button pressed down and then switch the
camera on
The update process begins. This can take up to 15 minutes.
Displays
Viewfinder LED
(permanently lit up)
Back LED
During the procedure
UP
lights up
After an update
UP
goes out
Battery capacity too
low for update proce-
dure
bc
flashes slowly
Update not possible*
Err
flashes quickly
*e.g. because the camera can`t find an update file on the cardEN
92
Accessories
SYSTEM ACCESSORIES
INTERCHANGEABLE LENSES
The Leica M system provides a basis for optimum adaptation to
fast and unobtrusive photography. The range of lenses incorpo-
rates focal lengths from 16 to 135mm and light intensities up to
1:0.95.
FILTERS
Various filter types and sizes are available for the current Leica M
lenses.
Note:
Leica UV/IR filters specially developed for use on the Leica M8
and M8.2 should not be used on the Leica M as they can cause
color shifts at the edges of pictures, particularly when using wide
angle lenses.
MIRROR VIEWFINDER M
Mirror viewfinders are available for 18, 21, and 24mm lenses. They
feature an exceptionally compact design and a bright viewfinder
image. Bright line frames like those in the camera viewfinder are
used to select the trimming (order no. 18mm: 12 022 black,
12 023 silver/21mm: 12 024 black, 12 025 silver/24mm: 12 026
black, 12 027 silver).
UNIVERSAL WIDE ANGLE VIEWFINDER M
The Leica universal wide-angle viewfinder M is a thoroughly practi-
cal accessory. It can be used without restriction on all analog and
digital Leica M models and – just like the viewfinder in the camera
– uses a reflected bright-line frame to outline the picture area for
wide angle focal lengths 16, 18, 21, 24 and 28mm. The viewfinder
is equipped with parallax compensation and a vial (spirit level) for
exact leveling of the camera.
(Order No. 12 011)
VIEWFINDER MAGNIFIERS M 1.25x AND M 1.4x
The Leica M 1.25x and M 1.4x viewfinder magnifiers significantly
simplify picture composition when using focal lengths above
35mm. They can be used on all Leica M models and magnify the
central area of the viewfinder image. The 1.25x viewfinder magni-
fier gives the 0.68 x viewfinder on this camera a magnification of
0.85 x, while the 1.4 x gives 0.95 x magnification.
A security chain with snap fasteners prevents loss and can be used
to hang the viewfinder on the carrying strap’s fastening ring.
The viewfinder magnifiers are supplied in a leather bag. A loop on
the case a

Leave a Comment